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The Campbell Shipyard used to be one of the most unfishable and unswimmable bodies of water in San Diego. From the 1880s to the 1920s, this part of the San Diego Bay served as a garbage dump, shipbuilding hub, petroleum-manufacturing center and gas-waste disposal site. These industries left massive amounts of harmful chemicals (PCBs, tributyltin, heavy metals and others) embedded in the bay’s sediment. Ever since, they have slowly leaked into the bay’s water and crippled local ecosystems. The contaminants have also worked their way up the marine food chain and now harm the health of seafood in the area.

According to the Campbell webpage on the Port's website, in 1995 the Regional Water Quality Control Board ordered the Port of San Diego to solve the pollution problem. So the Port of San Diego, in partnership with San Diego Coastkeeper, San Diego Surfrider, members of the Bay Council and others developed a $15-million restoration plan. The project included an excavation of 15,000 cubic yards of polluted sediment from the bottom of the bay and the creation of a cap to isolate remaining contaminants from the rest of the bay’s water. The cap, built out of armored rock, concrete jacks, sand and a 1.6-acre eel grass habitat, is designed to restore biodiversity to the bay. The plan also included a 20-year monitoring period that began in 2008.

Campbell Sediment Cap Diagram

I’m proud to announce that water-quality tests indicate that the cap has been effective at keeping pollutants out of the bay. The eel grass habitat is now a thriving habitat for local sand bass, lobsters and other marine life and a protected nursery for young fish populations.

The Campbell Sediment Cap is a shining example of the great things we can accomplish when state and local municipalities, businesses, community members and organizations like San Diego Coastkeeper work together with the common goal of protecting and restoring swimmable, fishable, drinkable water. You can hear the details of the full story, starting from the 1800s to present day, at the Port of San Diego’s new Campbell Sediment Cap educational site

 

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Every year, the first major rain after the dry summer season gives us an opportunity to see the complicated problem of urban runoff and its impacts to our water quality. Urban runoff is water that flows over thehard scape surfaces we fill our cities with and drains directly into our waters. Stormwater, irrigation, and other water carry pollutants such as trash, oil, grease, pesticides, metals, bacteria and viruses, and toxic chemicals.

And it washes into our rivers, bays, lakes and ocean - untreated. 

To unwind this major water quality issue in San Diego would require turning back the clock to a time before we developed the county and rethinking how we paved, connected and changed the natural landscape. Still, today, we can do things to capture or slow down runoff before it hits our water or to prevent pollutants in the first place. In thinking about our upcoming stormy season, we tapped the brains of our water quality sampling volunteers, who collect water samples from nine of our eleven watersheds, to produce this list of the top ten places to watch urban runoff. In no scientific way, we ordered it from the most basic visual to the most compelling. We target different pollutants, diverse geographic locations, a varierty of infrastructure impacts and human health and use impacts.

Take a look. What do you see?

10. 2306 S Coast Highway: Open channel dumping onto the beach

This popular North County surf spot features an open channel carrying urban runoff from the adjacent parking lot and highway straight onto the beach. This location highlights how stormwater washes trash and dissolved pollutants from our developed places onto our beaches.

9. 300 Forward Street in La Jolla/Bird Rock: Drain at the street's end 

This is the most straightforward illustration of a storm drain labeled "drains to the ocean," where you can see the drain, the end of the street and the polluted water and its entrance to the Pacific. It simply illustrates the complicated infrastructure our region built that assumed pushing all water into our bays and ocean was the smartest way to keep our homes and businesses dry. 

8. Tourmaline Surf Park: Channelized stormwater outlet meets popular surf spot

This Pacific Beach surf spot is world-renowned for its waves, thankfully not for its urban runoff pollution. Risking intestional illnesses of all sorts, surfers get barreled here when its raining, unaware that a paved stormwater channel leads direct to sandy beach and into the water. Polluted runoff in this channel dumps directly in the surf zone.

urban runoff effects

7. Coast Boulevard Park: Cement pipe at ocean's edge

The Waterkeeper movement started decades ago because fisherman saw large industrial sites using massive pipes to discard pollution directly into the Hudson River. This location symbolizes San Diego's version of that as a cement pipe carries polluted water from the storm drain straight to the ocean. With the Hudson's pollution, fishermen could pinpoint a specific corporation responsible for dumping pollution into the water. In San Diego, it's impossible to target one contributor to this issue because every person adds to the problem as rain water runs over our homes, yards, driveways, workplaces and more, until it carries accumalted toxins to this singular end point. In this spot, a large algae plume from the excess nutrients (commonly caused by fertilizer) grows along the rocks at the end of the drain. You can even see the algae mat in this photo to the right.

6. Cottonwood creek at Moonlight State Beach:Storm Drain opening

We're particularly aware of this polluted runoff example because Moonlight Beach is a favorite among locals, families and surfers. It's one of those rare beaches where a community member organizes regular cleanups to keep it trash free. Surfers flock here. Families play here. But, it's also a prime location to see an open channel storm drain flow right to the sandy beach. 

5. San Dieguito River Park Stormwater Treatment lagoon: Treatment wetland in action

Is it too late to reverse the effects of polluted runoff? Absolutely not, especially when we get creative.

We chose this location because it showcases a stormwater pipe that drops large amounts of urban runoff from the nearby development. The folks at San Dieguito Lagoon built a treatment wetland to clean the water before it gets to the actual lagoon. Here, you'll see the pipe dumping water into the first pond. This first pond always has stagnant algae pond water, even when it's not raining. But, the good news in this solution-oriented example, is that you can see the treatment ponds prevent the gross water from reaching the lagoon. 

This illustrates what many people refer to as stormwater capture, and it also depicts the role that nature plays in helping humans handle polluted runoff.

In their natural state, our inland creeks slow polluted water and force it through nature's filter--offering a true eco-cleanse that can remove a lot of urban runoff pollution from water before it reaches the ocean. Sandly, by channelizing many of San Diego County's creeks, we dehabilitated nature's role by replacing vegetation with paved concrete to quickly move water away from our developed areas into our bays and ocean. 

4. Tecolote Shores, Mission Beach: Creek emptying into man-made bay

Mission Bay is gross--in this part of the bay. Here Tecolote Creek drains into Mission Bay, a tourism hot spot that we engineered when we rerouted the mouth of the San Diego River. Due to the high bacteria counts in this creek, this section of Mission Bay is often closed for swimming, even when it's not raining. It's particularly polluted here year round because this far-back section of Mission Bay does not have much current to mix the polluted water into the open ocean.

3. Dog Beach, Ocean Beach: The mouth of our region's largest river

The polluted runoff in this iconic location begins collecting bacteria and toxins from as far inland as Julian--the eastern edges of this watershed. The amount and the intensity of polluted runoff flowing through the mouth of this river demonstrate the gravity of our top water quality problem. Here, you're also likely to see a secondary issue in urban runoff--marine debris.

2. 3001 Harbor Drive: Trash

This bridge overlooks the outlet for Chollas Creek, one of San Diego County's most polluted creeks. Flowing through the most densely populated urban areas in the county, Chollas Creek is wrought with trash, oil, grease, pesticides, metals, bacteria and viruses and toxic chemicals. What makes this secure the #2 spot on our list of ten is that you can see a trash boom designed to capture trash flowing from upstream into the bay. Particularly with the popularity of photos on the Internet, many people have seen images from around the globe featuring humans in boats surrounded by massive amounts of trash in the water. It's easy to dismiss that in San Diego because we do have strong trash and recycling systems in place. But, if you find yourself here at the end of Chollas Creek, you may see that marine debris issues are much closer to home than they appear. 

1. Dairy Mart Road: Binational polluted runoff

During the winter, the Tijuana River overruns the South Bay International Wastewater Treatment Plant in San Ysidro, California. It then runs through the Tijuana River Estuary, one of the largest remaining Southern California coastal wetland habitats. This area is as important stopover on the Pacific Flyway bird migratory route. Unfortunately, the river carries large amounts of raw sewage as well as trash and sediment straight through the estuary and onto the beaches near Imperial Beach. During the winter, the river flows close nearby beaches. This one location perfectly illustrates that urban runoff is not "one person's problem" or even "one country's problem." It highlights trash management issues as well as chemical water quality issues. This location slots into #1 because of the severity of the polluted runoff, the amount of the water flowing in this spot and the complicated matter of finding solutions to polluted runoff that starts in the U.S., flows through Mexico and completes it journey back in America.

Did we miss a location that you think should earn a spot on our top ten list of places to experience and learn about polluted runoff issues? Please, share with us your ideas in the comments below. 




 

 

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Project SWELL Hands-On Lesson

Without question, my favorite task as part of the education team at San Diego Coastkeeper is teaching lessons for ProjectSWELL. Project SWELL (Stewardship: Water Education for Lifelong Leadership), a school-based science curriculum, teaches K-6 students about the importance of the San Diego region's waterways. Usually, Project SWELL offers free SWELL kits, curriculum and professional trainings for educators. But this year, the Stiefel Behner Charitable Fund has made it possible to give one hands-on lesson at every school in the San Diego Unified School District. 

I go on solo missions to second grade classrooms with the goal of educating and inspiring our future leaders to care about water quality. In class, we create a model that shows how water carries sediment down an incline. After experimenting with water and earth materials, we add pollution. We put plastic, paper and aluminum on the slope and watch rain move the pollution downstream and straight into the ocean.

When I walk around with green and red food coloring to simulate pet waste and car oil, there is always an awesome simultaneous “ewwww!” I’m excited to watch the class engaged with water, pollution and solutions. The kids are stoked, the lesson is important, and the teachers are all helpful and enthusiastic.

Hearing children’s solutions to pollution is refreshing and exciting. A second grader from Miramar Ranch Elementary had the best solution I’ve heard so far. “I would vacuum the world!” How awesome is that?

To learn more about Project SWELL, visit the Project SWELL website.

 

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"The San Diego Unified Port District will protect the Tidelands Trust resources by providing economic vitality and community benefit through a balanced approach to maritime industry, tourism, water and land recreation, environmental stewardship and public safety." - Mission statement of the Port of San Diego

As advocates, individuals and organizations, we have many opportunities to influence policy. We are the voice of the people, the children, the wildlife and the water. That is why San Diego Coastkeeper seeks opportunities to interact with elected officials and policy makers. It is why we utilize public forums to express concerns and give kudos. And it is why we want every person to know that they have a voice. You can attend any public meeting and be heard. You can write a letter or request a meeting with your elected officials. You can do that today.

This week, I was reminded of this wonderful aspect of our democracy. At its regular board meeting on October 14, the Board of Port Commissioners considered transferring funds to the Port's Environmental Fund and Marine Terminal Impact Fund. The Environmental Fund advances projects to improve the condition of the bay and surrounding tidelands. The Terminal Fund advances projects that offset the impact of maritime terminal operations on communities near the tidelands. Taken together, these two initiatives manage projects that care for our community and ensure Port operations have a positive influence on the surrounding environment.

While deciding the funding for these activities is a seemingly benign task--perhaps even an altruistic one--two factors belie that simplicity. First, in past years, the Port has borrowed money from the Environmental Fund to shore up operational costs. Second, the Port's own mission declares environmental stewardship and public safety as essential parts of its purpose. The decision on October 14 turns out to be one that speaks directly to the Board of Port Commissioner's dedication to the promise made in the Port's mission statement.

Since the Port tidelands and surrounding communities encompass five cities and many acres of protected land and water, environmental and community advocates paid close attention to this decision. Thanks to effective leadership and a timely heads up from Environmental Health Coalition's Kayla Race, I attended the meeting to deliver comments to the commissioners alongside EHC and staff from the office of David Alvarez, San Diego City Council Environment Committee Chair.

Below are the comments I delivered on behalf of San Diego Coastkeeper. Read to the end to find out what happened. 

***

Good afternoon Chairman Nelson, Commissioners,

My name is Megan Baehrens, Executive Director of San Diego Coastkeeper and member of the Port's Environmental Advisory Committee, where we were briefed on and discussed this issue in August.

First of all, let me applaud you and commend the staff on achieving a budget surplus while also fulfilling your mission. That is no small feat.

And on top of that, I commend the clarity of purpose that leads you to this decision about re-funding the Environmental Fund. While having borrowed from the fund in order to sustain important operational needs—without which the mission cannot be met--is understandable, returning those funds is equally essential to achieve the environmental stewardship that forms an important part of that mission.
I urge you to fund the Environment Fund fully at $2.0 million. And I want to call out the fact that this is not a conversation solely about dollars and cents. Each dollar represents an environmental benefit. And a benefit that has been foregone for the time that those funds were used elsewhere. Now that we have the opportunity, thanks to prudent operations, our Port deserves a fully funded environmental stewardship effort.

In regards to the Marine Terminal Impact Fund, I understand that each option you consider includes the same funding and applaud the care-taking of communities affected by marine terminal operations. The MTIF has been plagued by administrative challenges that lead it so far to mete out very few funds, if any. I hope, indeed urge you to ensure, they are addressed shortly. Otherwise adding funds to that pot is like throwing good money after bad. The Environmental Fund serves as an example of ways in which the Port has effectively issued grants and I believe you can take that as an example.

Thank you for your stewardship of our Port communities and environment and for the opportunity to speak today.

***

The Commissioners unanimously approved adding $500,000 to the Marine Terminal Impact Fund and $2 million to the Environmental Fund.

One moment stands out from the discussion at the meeting. Chairman Bob Nelson and Commissioner Rafael Castellanos noted that the only public comment on the item came from people speaking in favor of returning $2 million to the Environmental Fund. In any public decision, it is our right and responsibility to voice our position, our preference and our reasons for both. In this case, we are validated in that effort.

I want everyone to experience the power of civic engagement. So Coastkeeper will soon be hosting events to help you understand the ins and outs of making your voice heard. Keep an eye on the newsletter and we'll see you then.

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surf-divaPhoto Credit Surf DivaThis last legislative session was good for California's waters. Our elected officials passed a package of bills to initiate regulation on the use of our overtapped groundwater resources, -- a long time in the making. They also passed a bill that makes California the first state to ban single-use plastic bags, an issue San Diego Coastkeeper has passionately pushed for many years. The statewide California Coastkeeper Alliance represented the environmental voice at the capital, working tirelessly to educate legislators and advocate for strong bills.

But there's one-little-known bill that they passed for which I am super thrilled--SB1395. Officially known as "Public beaches: inspection for contaminants," this new law has the potential to change the way we monitor beaches for public health. We unofficially call it: rapid water quality information to keep us safe at beaches.

Currently, state law mandates that public health officers monitor our beaches for fecal indicator bacteria and issue an advisory when the beach has a high bacteria count. We use these date to update our Swim Guide beach closure map.

water-sample-s

There is one (major) problem with this testing program. The county uses the same tests we use at Coastkeeper in our lab. This test requires the county to culture out the bacteria, a process that takes 18-48 hours. This time difference between sampling and results means water quality warnings actually say: "This beach should have been closed yesterday; today we should keep it closed." And because the county needs two clean tests to reopen a beach, it could be closed for three days.

About a year ago, we discussed this health issue with County Supervisor Greg Cox, and we told him about a new way to quantify the amount of bacteria in the water. Instead of the culturing process, we can measure the amount of fecal indicator bacteria DNA present in a water sample. This quicker method is called quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). We can have results in two to four hours as opposed to 24 hours. This means we can close the beach the same day as the sampling happens AND reopen beaches a whole day earlier than we can now.

LabSamples 9Mphoto 3Supervisor Cox's 2013 State of the County speech pleasantly surprised us when he directed county staff to do a one-year pilot study to look into the feasibility of using qPCR to monitor our beaches. On the heels of that study, Supervisor Cox worked with State Senator Marty Block to introduce a bill allowing public health officers to choose to use this new testing method. This is the bill that was passed recently and waits for the Governor's signature.

We give thanks to Supervisor Cox, Senator Block and our partners at the California Coastkeeper Alliance for their efforts in helping to protect our state's beaches and the health of all beach users. Now, it's up to Governor Brown to sign this bill and make it a reality for the state.

Please join us in urging Governor Brown to sign this bill. You can contact him at this link.

 

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05.07-press-event-students-As this historic drought continues, it’s easy to see how dependent we are on water. Allowing students at a young age to explore the water in their communities creates a better understanding of how to preserve and protect this resource while gaining valuable science skills. 

That’s why in 2003, we partnered with San Diego Unified School District, and the City of San Diego’s Think Blue Outreach program to create Project SWELL (Stewardship: Water Education for Lifelong Leadership).  In Project SWELL, the impacts of humans on water are explored through a well-balanced, comprehensive, and hands-on water quality and pollution prevention course of study. Project SWELL helps teachers empower students to understand and improve the condition of San Diego waterways. 

Project SWELL is a state standards-based science curriculum that teaches children about the importance of the region's waterways by providing teachers with training about the scientific content, information on how to conduct scientific investigations and in-class support including materials, in class teacher trainings and lesson plans. 

Through this partnership, San Diego Coastkeeper has created a hands-on program that offers training for teachers, makes it easy to engage students and meets new standards. Each Project SWELL unit of study (grades K, 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6) consists of 5 or 6 age appropriate, standards-based lessons that build student understanding of San Diego's aquatic environments and emphasize the actions that students can take to improve them.

SDUSD K-6 teachers are you looking for an environmental education curriculum that helps your students realize the Common Core and Next Generation Science Standards? Our lessons can help your students develop critical thinking, find solutions to real-life problems using science, practice reading informational text, writing, and increase their science literacy.

And here's what we offer for teachers:

Classroom visits free of cost. Students will do hands-on experiments, models and/or find solutions to real-life problems using science. Teachers if you want a SWELL expert to present in your staff meeting or classroom contact us today! Reservations for class visits must be submitted 2 weeks before your anticipated class visit.

SWELL Science Kits are offered through the district's Instructional Media Center upon teacher request and include materials for 36 K-2 and 4-6 grade lessons.

Professional Development is offer twice a year for K-2nd and 4th-6th grade SDUSD teachers. Teachers receive 1.5 hrs. of professional development, SWELL kit, and time compensation. Please visit www.projectswell.org for more details and to download curriculum.

Contact us at (619) 758-7743 x125 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . To learn more about Project SWELL visit the Project SWELL website.

 

 

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Wow! The Seaside Soiree was a lot of fun and a huge success. It was great to talk to you about your vision for fishable, swimmable and drinkable waters in San Diego County.

Morgan_Bailey_Kristine_Gallagher

Kristine Gallagher and Morgan Bailey at the 17th Annual Seaside Soiree
Photography Volunteered by Tom Mills and Jennifer Kendrick (see our Facebook album, too)

Thanks to your generosity, the 2014 Seaside Soiree raised $30,000 that will go directly to programs to protect and restore fishable, swimmable, drinkable water in San Diego County. And with a match incentive extended by the Stiefel Behner Charitable Fund, we now have a three-month challenge to fundraise $25,000. (To get us started, our Board of Directors President Jo Brooks and I each donated $500--won't you join us today?)

With your donation today and the funds raised at our Seaside Soiree, it means:

  • Countywide watersheds will continue to be monitored with a volunteer force and ecosystem health will be measured with new bioassessment technologies.

  • Officials throughout the county will hear from us on programs and laws to prevent over-watering and pollution.

  • Teachers will be trained by San Diego Coastkeeper in watershed science and provided hands-on materials to use with their knowledge-hungry students.

  • We will ensure we wean ourselves from a diet of 80 percent foreign water and use the resources that already flow through our water pipes to provide clean, safe local drinking water in San Diego County.

Special thanks to Michael Gelfand, CEO of Campland on the Bay, who presented a generous $15,000 donation to kick off a campaign through which Campland visitors can donate $1 per night during their stay at this Mission Bay campground. 

Thank you to all who helped to make this event such a success. You are the heart and soul of clean water in our county.

As San Diego Coastkeeper looks forward to our 20th anniversary next year, you have shown us that the movement for healthy waterways is strong.

Please always feel free to comment on a blog post, drop us a line, or stop by our office.  I'd be most pleased to continue the great conversations that began overlooking the Pacific Ocean last week.

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This year's Seaside Soiree will feature the following incredible prize packages for auction. If you haven't bought your tickets yet, buy them now here!

Food. Drinks. Fishy Dance Moves.
September 10, 2014.
6pm - 9pm
Scripps Seaside Forum
#seasidesoiree

AUCTION PACKAGES

  1. Mammoth Lakes Mountain Getaway
    Discover Mammoth Lakes Mountain with this seven (7) night stay (over one weekend) at a private home approximately 3,000 square feet with three (3) stories including three (3) bedrooms and four (4) baths. Have fun with the game room that includes ping pong, bumper pool, darts and workout equipment. Relax with a cozy fire place, wireless internet, stereos and TV with DVD player. The house is within walking distance of the Village and Gondola for skiing, and a short drive to Canyon Lodge. *Winner to coordinate directly with owner. Dates are subject to availability and owner's approval and must be completed by December 2015. Christmas and President's Day are not available in 2014. Up to eight (8) people.

  2. Day on San Diego BaysailboatExplore San Diego Bay on a 33 foot classic wooden "PC" sailboat with three-time Olympic medalist, Mark Reynolds. Enjoy a day on the San Diego Bay with you and three friends for a three to four hour tour. *Valid until March 2015. Scheduled date will be determined by Mr. Reynolds and will depart from San Diego Yacht Club, Point Loma. Tour will take place between 11AM-5PM.

  3. VIP Wine Tasting and Tour II
    Enjoy a VIP wine tasting and tour at J. Lohr Vineyards and Wines in Paso Robles, CA. You and your guests (up to eight total) will enjoy this world-class, sustainable winery, explore the property, participate in barrel tasting, tour the facility and enjoy complimentary tasting of the current wines. You will also receive a 20% discount on all purchases that day. Valued at $400. *By appointment, weekdays only. Excludes festival and holiday weekends. All attendees must be 21 years of age.

  4. Golfing in Style
    Win this package and play golf in style with a right hand man's driver and headcover, and a stand bag from Callaway Golf. Every golfer will love this package. Valued at $520.

  5. Take a Nature Walk with Jo Brooks at the Tijuana Estuary Tour
    Discover the native plants and the singing birds at the Tijuana Estuary with a tour led by Jo Brooks. This is an excellent place to enjoy and explore the natural beauty in San Diego.

    AUCTION ART

  6. Skye Walker Art I
    Win this print from creative, ocean-loving artist, Skye Walker. Skye Walker has been an artist his whole life and is passionate about all forms of art: paintings, graphic design, murals, and more. You can visit his latest mural at the California Coast Credit union in Hillcrest.

  7. Skye Walker Art II
    Win this print and limited edition reusable water bottle from creative, ocean-loving artist, Skye Walker. Skye Walker has been an artist his whole life and is passionate about all forms of art: paintings, graphic design, murals, and more. You can visit his latest mural at the California Coast Credit union in Hillcrest.

  8. Connie Cannon
    Win this "In Italy" collage from Connie Cannon who creates abstract art. Connie Cannon incorporates warm and vibrant colors into her art expressing her passioSeaQuilt ElCamino-smn and love for abstract art. Valued at $225.

  9. Quilt
    Win these beautiful, handmade quilt pieces from El Camino Quilters. The underwater themed quilts will be a great addition to any home or office in San Diego County.

  10. Abe Ordover
    A true nature lover, Abe Ordover enjoys taking photographs of the beautiful nature we live in. Abe Ordover's stunning photographs have been shown in gallery shows and museums across the country including New York City, Atlanta, Palo Alto, Nashville, Dallas and San Diego. Abe currently operates the gallery at the Natural History Museum in Balboa Park. His most recent shows have been at the L Street Gallery here in San Diego and also at University of San Diego.

  11. Steve Blackwell
    Steve Blackwell grew up in New York and San Diego, then worked as a park ranger in Yosemite. He is known for his many paintings of the Sierra Nevada. Steve worked as a wildlife biologist throughout California and gives educational hikes about the native plants. Since moving to the Pacific Coast, his art reflects the local marine environment. You can visit his art at the AIR Gallery in Laguna Beach and most of the proceeds go to the SoCal Land and Water Conservancy.

    OPPORTUNITY DRAWING PACKAGES

  12. Girl's Day
    You don't want to miss out on winning this package. You and two friends can attend a workout class from Bar Method - Solana Beach with your 30-day unlimited classes pass and two guest passes. Then enjoy getting a manicure or pedicure from Gel Touch Nail Spa with your fourteen $10 gift certificates and finish the day with relaxing in a luxurious robe and a pair of sheepskin slippers from UGG Australia. Valued at $585. *Bar Method only in Solana Beach; valid until September 15, 2015. Gel Touch Nail Spa valid until April 15, 2015.

  13. Dancing and Dinner for the Family
    Have your family explore different types of dance at Malashock Dance Company with four adult and four children dance classes. There is no need to worry if you are a beginner, Malashock Dance Company welcomes all levels. Also, enjoy two admission tickets to the Malashock/RAW 5 Performance at the Lyceum Theater in Horton Plaza. After the show, eat dinner at The Cheesecake Factory with two $25 gift cards. Valued at $160. *Valid until November 1, 2014. For children classes, ages 3 and up. For adult classes, beginners through advanced level.

  14. Dinner and a Museum
    Enjoy an evening out exploring Maritime Museum on Harbor Island and then dinner at Slater's 50/50 in Liberty Station. Explore one of the world's greatest collection of historic ships, including the Star of India at the Maritime Museum with four admission tickets. Then head over to Slater's 50/50 with two $10 gift certificates for craft burgers and a lengthy local, craft beer selection. Need a boost? Grab a coffee or beverage from Starbucks with a $10 gift card. Valued at $84. *Maritime Museum of San Diego admission tickets are not valid for special events.

  15. Two for Dinner and a Show
    Attend one of the many 2014-2015 season performances at the La Jolla Playhouse with two admission tickets. Also, enjoy two admission tickets to the San Diego Symphony and explore the wonders of incredible music. After the show, eat dinner at The Cheesecake Factory with two $25 gift cards. Valued at $210-320. *La Jolla Playhouse valid for 2014-2015 season. Only valid for the first two weeks of performances and excludes all Saturday evening performances. Not valid for any musical or special engagements. San Diego Symphony valid until April 10, 2015. Admission tickets to any regular 2014-2015 winter season performance.

  16. Kids Day Out
    This one is for the family. Connect and explore with music through hands-on exhibits and programs at the Museum of Making Music with four admission tickets. Then get creative at the New Children's Museum with a family four-pack of guest passes. Here, you will have the opportunity to create art and interactive with exhibits. Also, win a family four-pack of guest passes and discover local wildlife at the Living Coast Discovery Center. Here, you can interact with animals and explore their natural habitats. Need a boost? Enjoy a $10 gift card to Starbucks. Valued at $160. *Museum of Making Music valid until September 10, 2015.

  17. Exploring Art
    Win four guest passes to the Museum of Contemporary Art and enjoy the day indulging in art exhibits and experiencing the local culture. Then head over to the Mingei International Museum with four guest passes to discover art, craft and design from all eras and cultures around the world. After a long day, relax with a $25 gift card to Panera Bread. Valued at $97.

  18. History in Balboa Park
    See the wonders of Balboa Park with four guest passes to Mingei International Museum and four guest passes to San Diego History Center. Discover art, craft and design from all eras and cultures around the world at the Mingei International Museum. Then stroll over to San Diego History Center and explore the historic story of our local community. Need a boost? Grab a coffee or beverage from Starbucks with a $10 gift card. Valued at $74. *San Diego History Center guest passes valid until August 2015.

  19. Science in Balboa Park
    See the wonders of Balboa Park with four admission tickets to San Diego Air and Space Museum and two admission tickets to Reuben H. Fleet Science Center. Celebrate the history of aviation and space flight and explore the many exhibits to understand the technology and science needed in air and space exploration. Then stroll over to the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center and explore the hands-on science exhibits and discover your imagination. Need a boost? Enjoy a $10 gift card to Starbucks. Valued at $116. *Reuben H. Fleet Science Center admission tickets valid until July 14, 2015.

  20. Private Wolf Tour
    Enjoy a private tour with California Wolf Center for up to four people. Learn about Rocky Mountain gray wolves and Mexican gray wolves and experience a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to observe these animals. Valued at $200. *Private tours are scheduled between Monday and Friday. Availability is limited. Call for reservations.

  21. Be Active in San Diego
    Enjoy the natural beauty through outdoor adventure with Hike, Bike, Kayak and Moment Bicycles. Win a two-hour guided tour of La Jolla's ecological marine reserve and sea caves for four people. Moment Bicycles specializes in Dynamic Bike Fit and this package includes a three-day bike rental. They have carbon and aluminum road bikes and carbon triathlon bikes to choose from. Valued at $379. *Call Hike, Bike, Kayak for reservations. Moment Bicycles valid until December 31, 2014. Call to schedule your rental.

  22. One for the Guys
    Win two beginner climbing packages from Mesa Rim Climbing Center and a luxurious robe and pair of sheepskin slippers from UGG Australia. Mesa Rim is the largest indoor climbing gym on the west coast and has the highest walls in San Diego. Get ready to discover your passion for indoor climbing with two day passes, two gear rentals and two belay lessons. Then after an exciting day of climbing, relax in your new robe and slippers. Valued at $325. *Call Mesa Rim for reservations.

  23. Send a Letter to a Friend
    Sending a card to an old friend or a family member will help brighten their day. Win this package of greeting cards from June Rubin Studio and Gallery and from Outside The Lens. Also, enjoy a cup of coffee or tea while you write your letters with a $10 Starbucks gift card. Valued at $155.

  24. Lunch and a Garden for Two
    Enjoy lunch at Panera Bread with a $25 gift card and then explore San Diego Botanic Garden's 4 miles of trails on 37 acres with two guest passes. The San Diego Botanical Garden is a great place to relax and enjoy the garden, learn about gardening or bird watch. Want to get some fun exercise in? Head down to UTC Ice Sports Center and use your Ice Funcard for admission. Valued at $113. *San Diego Botanical Garden valid until September 2015. UTC Ice Funcard valid for public admission only.

Click here to buy your tickets now!

Food. Drinks. Fishy Dance Moves.
September 10, 2014.
6pm - 9pm
Scripps Seaside Forum
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Welcome to part four of our five part blog series (see part one and two, three and five) on the best ways to enjoy San Diego's very own ASBS and Matlahuayl State Marine Reserve. La Jolla Cove and La Jolla Shores are both protected areas -- the Cove and Shores are both classified as Areas of Special Biological Significance and La Jolla Shores is also a marine reserve known as the Matlahuayl State Marine Reserve. These posts will show you how to enjoy these special places while not harming those that live there. 

In the last post, we went through some ideas to protect the environment while tidepooling!  Today, we will see some tips on how to protect ourselves during our explorations while still being envrionmentally friendly.

Safety Guide

Tidepooling is usually a safe activity, for all ages; however, you can get yourself hurt if you are careless. Here are some safety tips, based on my own experiences in La Jolla Shores, I would also like to share with you:

  1. Stay away from the cliffs.
    La Jolla Shores is a special place, and one of the things that make it special are the cliffs. They are dangerously beautiful - rockfall is a constant threat.
  2. Watch out for waves.
    They can hit you by surprise and can even sweep you off your feet! Always keep an eye for the sea; La Jolla usually has short waves, which lead to a false sense of safety. Don’t stay near rock edges.
  3. Wear closed and sturdy shoes. 
    Rocks, mussels and barnacles can be sharp - protect yourself. Wear comfortable clothes.
  4. Know the tides beforehand.
    You may became stranded by the rising tide.
  5. Mind the algae.
    Some algae are very slimy, therefore slippery, don’t step on the algae or you can fall.
  6. Protect yourself from the sun.
    Apply sunscreen often and generously. Wear protective pieces of clothing and don’t forget your hat.
  7. Go in the winter!
    Take advantage of San Diego’s mild winter, when you can enjoy the lowest tides. You will be able to see so much more!

Greener Habits Guide

Now that you know how to be safer in the tidepools, it is time to be greener! What you bring to the beach is a big part of this, and choosing environmentally friendly alternatives to the products you usually bring. It is noticeable that while advertising tries to sell us the most expensive and high-tech, the best solution is often cheap and/ or homemade.

Sunscreen that is good for you and the environment. 
You already know that you have to use it and probably how to use it effectively. Yet, some heavy chemistry goes in this products to defend skin from the sun, and there is evidence that this can cause harmful effects in wild organisms.  You can choose biodegradable sunscreen or avoid high toxicity components to minimize effects.  Environmental Working Group has compiled a list of toxic components. Sprays and powders spread chemical particles everywhere - creams are a better option. You can also avoid very high SPF, as it can be more toxic.

Reduce single use plastics 
Snacks like cereal bars are handy, but they can contain high levels of sugar and come individually packaged, often with non-recyclable materials. Fruit is often the best solution-healthy, tasty, and biodegradable. I prefer reusable bottles for water and/or homemade juices instead of sodas and juice boxes with those individually wrapped plastic straws that often are gone with the wind.

It’s tidepooling time!

Now that you have your backpack ready and know how to be safe in the pools, it is time to go outside explore the wildlife of the shore. Just don’t forget the tidepool rules we learned on the last post. With this information, you will be up to a great time, without causing much impact on nature. Experiencing natural habitats is great way to create an environmental conscience. It is everybody’s obligation to protect these habitats, so we all can visit and enjoy.

 

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Welcome to part two of our three part blog series (see part onethree, four and five) on the best ways to enjoy San Diego's very own ASBS and Matlahuayl State Marine Reserve. La Jolla Cove and La Jolla Shores are both protected areas -- the Cove and Shores are both classified as Areas of Special Biological Significance and La Jolla Shores is also a marine reserve known as the Matlahuayl State Marine Reserve. These posts will show you how to enjoy these special places while not harming those that live there. 

Before we go exploring the tidepools, let’s learn a little bit more about this habitat.

tidepool-zonation-sdck1. Seagulls 2. Tide-pool Sculpin 3. Acorn Barnacle 4. Rock Louse 5. Periwinkles 6. Turban Snail 7. Stripped Shore Crab 8. Limpets 9. Goose-neck Barnacle 10. Mussels 11. Aggregating Sea-anemone 12. Hermit Crab 13. Barnacles 14. Sea-star 15. Brittle sea-star 16. Spiny lobster 17. Seaweed 18. Surf sea-grass

Many species live in the narrow band between the sea and the land. Some of them make rocks their home because of the support it provides for them. These creatures are subject to many hardships: they have evolved to endure desiccation, wave impact, and insane temperature changes. Because of this they often have hard bodies with shells or calcareous (a hard, cement-like substance) deposits. Tidepools are filled with competition. Space is scarce on the rocky shore and the organisms are constantly fighting for it. They try to outgrow each other and often get creative to find new spaces. They also have to protect themselves from wave impact which is why they are often strongly attached to rocks.

The lower parts of the rocky shore are occupied by algae and other organisms that are willing to stay underwater most of the time. The higher parts are full of limpets (#8 on illustration) and barnacles (#3 on illustration) that are able to survive long periods with out water, also known as desiccation. The level of exposure to the waves and other environmental factors results in zonation of the tidepools. 

Stronger organisms live in parts of the tidepools exposed to stronger waves (High Tide Zone) while fragile ones hide in protected areas (Low Tide Zone). 

The zonation is very important to keep the balance of this amazing coastal ecosystem. The food web (who eats who) in the tide pools is quite complex -- it consists of many levels and many different predators. As a consequence, each species has adapted to a different strategy to obtain food, creating rich and beautiful biodiversity.

la-jolla-ecology-sdck

tide-pool-tramplingFragile Beauty

All this ocean beauty could be menaced by our activities.

Walking (trampling)
The constant stepping on top of rocks removes their algal cover and destroys the tide pool community. 

Collecting
Collecting animals or even empty shells can leave the hermit crabs homeless.

Urban runoff
After it rains, the sediments and pollutants from the streets can be deadly to the tidepool creatures.

la-jolla-trash-sdck

Trash
Our trash can enter the tidepools and cause damage. We need to take action to protect the tidepool communities.

The tidepools house many living creatures -- when we explore them we are only guests. In the next posts, we will see what it takes to be good guests. We will talk  about “house rules”, and the ways to take care of ourselves while in this beautiful wild place.

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Marine Ecology 101

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Swimmable Facts

  • Urban runoff is the number one threat to water quality in San Diego. 
  • San Diego beaches close for 3 days after it rains. Pollution prevention and better testing will get us get back in the water sooner.
  • One of the top dive and snorkel sites in San Diego is a MPA (La Jolla-Matlahuayl State Marine Reserve). You can swim there with leopard sharks and the Garibaldi, the state marine fish of California.
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