Coastal Commission Instructs Wetlands Compromise

Written by San Diego Coastkeeper

San Diego County will grow. We have a newly renovated downtown airport. We’ll soon have an expanded bayfront convention center. And the 22nd District Agricultural Association is working to maintain the world-class Del Mar Fairgrounds. As we renovate and grow to meet the demands of our residents and economy, we must look at how existing natural resources—if we consider them assets and let them perform their natural function—can help us do that sustainably.

I testified at the October 11, 2013 California Coastal Commission hearing about just that matter. The dirt lots and golf driving range surrounding the Del Mar Fairgrounds that house overflow parking for the Fair and the Races are in fact home to acres of wetlands. Despite being graded, compacted and parked on year after year, they survive and offer the invaluable service of a natural filter to cleanse water before it heads into the San Dieguito River, the estuary and Pacific Ocean that all lie in a stone’s throw of the property.

Thanks to an historic agreement between the Coastal Commission and the District Agricultural Association (DAA), the DAA will set aside one of those lots (the “South Overflow Lot”) and invest funds to restore that area to its natural abundance. The permit application they submitted to the Coastal Commission includes beautiful plans to do that and the DAA should be commended.

The issue at hand at this hearing was their plan to move all the event and parking activity previously undertaken on the South Overflow Lot to the adjacent “East Overflow Lot.” Along with the San Dieguito Joint Powers Authority and County Supervisor Dave Roberts, I asked the Coastal Commission to approve the permit with an amendment that would set aside the lower third of the East Overflow Lot and allow it to return to its natural wetland state.

I enjoy cotton candy at the fair and 4 o’clock Fridays at the racetrack as much as the next person. But when we build a massive facility upon and adjacent to sensitive waterways, we have a responsibility. And in this case, we have a tremendous opportunity at hand. Rather than pave over a wetland and then engineer mechanical fixes or set aside properties in other areas to somehow “make up for” destroying these, why not let nature’s water filter do its job?

Most of the Coastal Commissioners seem to have been moved to a similar question. They voted (9-2) to continue the matter to their November meeting. Commission Chair Shallenberger urged the parties to work hard to come to an agreement and appear before the Commissioners again soon.

Thanks to leadership from Supervisor Roberts and the San Dieguito Joint Powers Authority–and with a District Agricultural Association that has an opportunity to be a leader in how it uses unique its coastal backdrop–the wetlands, the water they protect and our home where the Turf Meets the Surf, will prosper.

 

Published in Urban Runoff

Storm Drains: The City’s Next Big Opportunity

Written by San Diego Coastkeeper

CLEAN WATER MAKES ME THINK…

girlschasesglobedotcomStormwater management. Deferred maintenance. Debt service. Not what you had in mind?

Well, wake up, San Diego. How City Hall deals with these seemingly mundane concerns will make or break our City’s success in the next decade. And every one of us plays a role—with our actions and our pocketbooks.

Stormwater is the otherwise innocent flow of water that comes out of gardens, off of cars and from the streets, carrying with it metal dust, bacteria, soaps and other pollutants– directly into our water. It’s the number one water pollution problem in San Diego. Nearly every waterway in the City of San Diego is listed on the federal “303(d)” list for excess amounts of some pollutant and a significant number of creeks, rivers and larger water bodies throughout the county are, as well.

A recent report from the City of San Diego Office of the Independent Budget Analyst underscores the need for careful financial planning to deal with our runoff, and its place among the many challenges (transportation, roads, safety) that we face to keep our motto as America’s Finest City.

We have a new stormwater permit that carries with it heavy penalties to the City for polluting our water over the limits and this has to become a call to action. We need to invest and we need to do so now. The report points out that we have delayed critical infrastructure improvements for way too long – and regulations currently in place mean that if we continue to kick the can down the road, fees will be harsh and damaging– as much as $37,500 per day ($10,000 from the new permit and $27,500 from the federal EPA).

So what does that mean to us?

(photo credit girlchasesglobe.com)

THE NUMBERS

Some would have us believe that faced with this investment, the case for pollution prevention is hopeless. Over the course of five years, we must invest $641 million dollars in stormwater management; over 18 years, it’s more than $2 billion. This includes routine maintenance, a backlog of maintenance and new construction needs that built up in past years, flood management and improvements to meet compliance requirements.

Ratepayers won’t stand for it, say some.

Bologna, say I.

The City is tasked with managing the day-to-day business of running a city of over a million people and thousands of businesses. But “the City” is us. Every time one of us turns on a hose, drives a vehicle, or sweeps dust into a gutter, the City prevents that from polluting the streams, lakes and ocean that lie downstream of the storm drain. And we pay them for that. Guess how much? We pay a whopping 95 cents per month per household. And that only covers about 15 percent of the demand placed on the General Fund. The Independent Budget Analyst’s report looked at whether ratepayer fees could keep up with growing demands. And we can.

This is where we need to step up. In five years our household contribution might rise to $11.14/month. On the commercial/industrial side, rates rise from $0.065/hundred cubic feet today to $0.76/hundred cubic feet in 2019. These are not insignificant rate increases. I’m not suggesting that they won’t be felt. Nor do I believe that an ever-rising debt burden to our City is something that we should take on casually.

But let’s stop and consider what this represents.

img 5671-sWe have an innovation economy that thrives on clean water for its processes and a beautiful city with outdoor recreation and healthy communities to attract top-notch employees. The maritime economy supports 46,000 jobs and looks to the City as a partner that must carry its weight to keep San Diego Bay healthy. Visitors from around the world choose our town for professional and social conventions, adventure and luxury vacations, picture-perfect weddings and as their go-to year-after-year escape. What about your Saturday trips to Mission Bay with the kids, morning fishing ritual and sunset walks? Those are in peril if we don’t recognize the role that we play and the stand the City must take.

But, what about the roads? That’s right! What about the roads? And the libraries, parks, schools, and first responders? This is not just about storm drains. This is about addressing all the needs that our City has.

We’re the eighth largest City in the nation and our needs are complex and constant. A mayor, city council and staff that can address these needs in a methodical, responsible way should earn the respect and support of our community.

An important factor to note is that the analysis about stormwater costs assumes zero growth in households. While this may be appropriately conservative, it is nonetheless inconsistent with the 2050 Regional Growth forecast by SANDAG (June 2010), which predicts double-digit population growth in our region over the 18-year period that this analysis takes place, 18% even by 2020. Here’s an easy-to-read account by Voice of San Diego. So both the ratepayer base—and the demand on our infrastructure—will grow. We can’t kick the can any more; we must deal with this now and the assessment needs to be holistic. In fact, managing the City’s water offers a perfect example of that. The question of stormwater, wastewater and drinking water should be examined together, a point of view that is gaining traction with planners and must continue to be the trend. When we look at stormwater, we should see a resource that can be captured and used to reduce other costs and demands. With innovative management like that, we’ll free up resources for other City needs.

SO WHAT, THEN?

The Office of the Independent Budget Analyst did a wise thing in its report. It looked to other California cities for best practices. And it found that other cities have higher stormwater fees. They have voter-approved bonds and taxes. And they have voter-approved fees for refuse collection and sewage infrastructure.

surfer sunsetThe City of San Diego has hard choices to make when considering its budget. Stormwater management is one of many things we have to address. Choices made in the past mean that we haven’t kept up with needed repairs. But we can’t just throw our hands in the air because it costs money to keep up with our urbanized community and let the infrastructure crumble around us. We are not a community of residents, businesses and cities to sit around and do nothing. We value our lakes, our rivers, our beaches, our ocean. They give us back an exceptional quality of life and a vibrant economy of innovation and maritime industry. That is why we must work—and work hard—to get these decisions right.

So don’t let the City decision-makers stall or claim that we can’t afford to protect our water from pollution. Can we make changes that reduce the cost? Yes, and we should. Eliminate it, or the need for it? No. So, demand from council members and the mayor that stormwater management stands high on their list of priorities. When you are asked to vote for a bond to fund deferred maintenance, vote yes. It’s the “I Love My Life In San Diego” bond, the “My Business Needs This” fee, and the “We’re in it Together” charge.

 

Published in Urban Runoff

A Coastkeeper Update from Executive Director Megan Baehrens

Written by San Diego Coastkeeper

 

Executive Director. Water Warrior. I answer to both.

The past two months, I’ve been on the front lines advocating for what will best protect our wetlands, watersheds, ocean and the water quality of San Diego County. There are two events in particular I want to give you the inside scoop on.

The first involved Del Mar Fairgrounds and protecting the wetlands threatened by its expansive parking lots. On October 11, County Supervisor Dave Roberts, former supervisor Pam Slater Price and the San Dieguito Joint Powers Authority joined our team to urge the California Coastal Commission to protect the wetlands that surround overflow parking areas at the Del Mar Fairgrounds. I love the races as much as anyone else, but we just can’t sacrifice the surrounding environmental habitats. There has to be a meeting of the minds on long term sustainability.

The Coastal Commission sent the 22nd District Agricultural Association, which manages that property, back to negotiate about what areas would remain protected from parking, paving and other high-impact use and what time each year these productive natural spaces would be subject to that pressure. Meanwhile, our Board President Jo Brooks appeared at the most recent Coastal Commission meeting to urge the Commissioners to require a “hands-off” approach because this is an important natural space that filters pollution and protects our waters better than any man-made construction can.

The results were mixed. The Coastal Commission did not grant our “hands-off” request and permits will be issued to allow the fairgrounds to use the wetlands for parking during additional horse races and activities. However, the Agricultural Association will end all activity, restore acres of wetland and study the feasibility of alternative parking that would allow economic activity to continue on the remaining East Lot area while still protecting the habitat that provides the stunning backdrop to those events. You can read more about our previous work to protect the wetlands at the Del Mar Fairgrounds here. Moving forward, we will continue to watch the health of our San Dieguito lagoon and Torrey Pines State Beach and advocate for protection from any threat we see.

Come November, things were still moving quickly in my water warrior world. I was asked to provide the Wetlands Advisory Board with insight on the new stormwater permit and what it offers to protect wetlands in San Diego.

There is a lot that is new and innovative about this permit, and I wanted the Board to understand how it can work for wetlands. This new way of managing stormwater promotes a watershed-based approach, replacing traditional approaches that would leave cities compliant, but potentially uncoordinated.

At this moment there are so many reasons to get involved; we have the opportunity to use a combination of structural and non-structured measures that target the highest-priority pollutants with the lowest-cost solutions. It combines the efforts of cities, businesses and public information campaigns to change residents’ behaviors. 

Lastly, we discussed how special studies can provide us more information about wetlands and alternative compliance solutions might protect important areas, especially those under threat. All of this is happening now, and early involvement by Board members and the members of the resident, scientific, environmental and business communities is critical. It’s the only way to find effective, cost-conscious decisions.

Plans are in the works to continue the conversation in early 2014. While this life of Executive Director/Water Warrior is constantly in motion, I couldn’t do it without your support. Thank you, and please stay tuned.

 

Published in Urban Runoff

Go Take a Walk: A Chollas Creek Tour with Assemblywoman Gonzalez

Written by San Diego Coastkeeper

Coastkeeper Chollas CreekI had the honor of joining our water quality lab manager and state Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez, the California League of Conservation Voters and Groundwork San Diego-Chollas Creek for a tour of District 80 and a conversation about how we can change the fate of Chollas Creek–one of our region’s most polluted waterways.

As we toured the urban reaches of this 32-mile creek, conversation ranged from monitoring ecosystem health with volunteer testing and our new bioassessment program to invasive plant removal to homelessness. We talked about trail maintenance and the value of residents getting involved with restoration and upkeep of this valuable resource in the community.

Coastkeeper and Groundwork have a project underway to restore a section of the creek and demonstrate water quality improvements. The Assemblywoman and League of Conservation Voters listened intently our optimism for success and our concerns about the difficulty small nonprofits face to effectively work under state grant contracts. We parted ways with enthusiastic pledges to follow-up regularly and plans to continue the important work in District 80.

Bringing together the power of community, activists and legislators like the group we had, Chollas Creek has a lot going for it.

 

Published in Urban Runoff

Swimmable California Day Photo Contest

Written by San Diego Coastkeeper

swimmable_day_california

Published in Urban Runoff

News from Noah: Coastkeeper’s Custom Autosampler Is Shaping Up

Written by San Diego Coastkeeper

The autosampler is slowly, but surely, progressing. After securing the necessary money, and finding and purchasing parts, I have taken the first few steps towards completing the autosampler. To remind everyone, this Noah_Pumpautosampler will allow us to use the autosampler to monitor urban runoff during rains, as it happens (without having our volunteers stand in the rain for hours).

Currently, I am working on refining my home-built peristaltic pump. Peristaltic pumps use compression to push water. Skateboard wheels will compress a plastic tube to push water from the creek and into the sample bottles.

The pump frame has been built, and the skateboard wheels have been installed. The wheels, along with some tubing, will be doing the heavy lifting of the water. Once the pump is finished, and pumping, the next step will be to set up the valve array, which will distribute the samples into their respective containers.

From here, I expect the pace to accelerate, as the pump will probably be the part that I need to fiddle with the most. After the valve array, the final step will involve powering and connecting all of the parts into a computer controlled system. I am planning on using two Arduino microprocessers working in conjunction as the brains of the system.

While working on the autosampler, I have learned a great deal about prototyping and design. In its current state, the autosampler is not much more than a prototype. I was surprised about all the fiddling and adjusting needs to happen in order to make this run perfectly. This project has been an enlightening experience: there are hundreds of things that will go wrong. But I will fix all of them.

Working on the autosampler in general, and the pump specifically, has given me the chance to explore new horizons. I have a project where I have creative freedom, will have an impact, and combines an appealing career path, robotics, and my work here at Coastkeeper. It’s a nice balance to my school work. I appreciate the hands on experience that I have gotten with engineering and design, something I probably would not have without Coastkeeper’s help.

The currently anticipated deployment date is in late August, early September. Ish. That said, when I was first talking about this project, I thought I could have it out by March. We’ll have to wait and see.

Published in Urban Runoff

The Stormwater “Safe Harbor” Explained

Written by San Diego Coastkeeper

This blog was published May 2, 2013. Click here for more up-to-date information on Safe Harbor laws in San Diego.

The Clean Water Act is the primary tool we use to protect and restore fishable, swimmable, and drinkable waters.  At its heart, the Clean Water Act focuses on the quality of our waters, and it allows states to issue permits allowing people to add pollution into our waters, but only in certain circumstances.  The Clean Water Act’s  bottom line is this—we can’t issue a permit if it would allow pollution that would make that water so dirty that it interferes with the water’s “beneficial uses” like swimming, fishing, or habitat for fish and other aquatic life. Even if the individual pollution permit would not alone cause the water quality problem, if it contributes to a water quality problem, that’s not allowed.

In order to make sure we are issuing water pollution permits that ultimately protect our waters, we have to look at the health of the waters.  And water pollution permits contain a provision that basically says, “when you add pollution to the waters, you cannot cause or contribute to a water quality problem in the water body you are adding pollution to.”  Sounds reasonable, right?

Apparently for San Diego County and our local municipalities, prohibiting them from contributing to existing pollution problems or creating new ones is asking too much. The county and our local cities have asked our Regional Water Quality Control board for a “safe harbor” excusing them from being accountable for local water quality, even though our storm sewer systems are the primary cause of most of our local pollution problems.

Why would they ask for this?  According to San Diego County Counsel James O’Day, the county needs protection from environmental groups who would “hold the county hostage” by bringing lawsuits against them. Even the City of San Diego’s estmeed Mayor Filner asked the Regional Board to provide “protection” for the City against environmental protection law suits. Ironic, since last weekend San Diego City Councilmember David Alvarez thanked the environmental groups that sued the City of San Diego on sewage issues because it helped move the city forward toward creating a local, secure, reliable, safe water supply.

In response to pleas by lawyers and politicians, the Regional Board added a “safe harbor” or “alternative compliance option” to the stormwater permit.  This “alternative compliance” provision protects cities or the county from being held accountable for pollution that causes or contributes to water quality problems, as long as they have done some modeling that shows that they might not cause or contribute to water quality problems if they do certain things, and then they plan to do those things.  They get this “protection” from the moment their plan is approved, and it continues indefinitely–even if the pollution actually causes or contributes to a water quality problem–as long as they keep trying to do better.

This flies in the face of the very heart of the Clean Water Act–focusing on the health of our waters and not allowing pollution that would cause or contribute to water quality problems.  At the Regional Board hearing on April 10 and 11, I compared this new safe harbor provision to mud on a cake.  The heart of our stormwater permit–the cake–is still good, and we’ve all worked very hard to make it together.  But this safe harbor is mud that basically ruins the permit for us.  Take this safe harbor away, and we like the new stormwater permit.

On May 8, the Regional Board will decide whether or not to leave the safe harbor provision in the permit.  Check back soon to see if they left mud on the cake!

Utilizing Volunteer-Generated Data

Written by San Diego Coastkeeper

A few weeks ago I was invited to attend a workshop hosted by the EPA called Technology to Empower Citizen Scientists. About 60 people from NGOs and state and federal agencies got together to discuss how we can work better together and how new technologies can help, especially in the area of bioassessment.

First, let me describe what bioassessment is. Our current water quality monitoring program looks at several very specific chemical concentrations in the stream. Among other things, we look at dissolved oxygen, nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus, and dissolved metals.  Our rivers and streams are not to exceed very specific limits of these chemicals, and we directed our program’s efforts to identifying if San Diego County’s rivers and streams are exceeding pollutant regulatory thresholds. Measuring these chemicals can give us a rough picture of stream health, but it isn’t complete without bioassessment.

Bioassessment measures the health of the stream by measuring algae and aquatic insect communities.  This gives us a more holistic view of the health of our waters. First, if the river is full of pollutant tolerant insects, but no pollutant sensitive species, pollution is most likely affecting stream health. Second, if algae are growing out of control, nutrients are affecting stream health. Chemical monitoring measures pollutants, then bioassessment measures the effects that those pollutants have on the aquatic ecosystem. We need more of these bioassessments in order to get a better picture of the health of our waterways. San Diego Coastkeeper will be starting our own volunteer-powered program next Spring ’14.

What struck me at this meeting, which was attended by folks from all over the country, was how comparatively open California is in utilizing volunteer-generated data.  We in California have a statewide database that anyone can upload into. We can also include our quality assurance data to show that the data generated is of good, useful quality. The Regional Water Quality Control Board as well as various municipalities around the county actively solicits us to send data to them so they can include it in their analysis and reports.  The new draft of San Diego’s stormwater permit has a section encouraging stormwater departments to partner with programs like ours to conduct special studies on water pollution. In short, our data is recognized for what it is: high quality and useful.

Unfortunately, most other states have put up roadblocks to utilizing volunteer generated data. For example, Ohio has this ridiculous law they call the “Ohio Credible Data Law.” Instead of letting the data speak for itself, volunteer data must pass various certification tests before it is considered. This is an expensive roadblock to utilizing good data.  A certificate may “certify” one’s data but it does not guarantee that the data is good. This is why it is imperative to look beyond a certification and directly at the quality assurance data to make a sound judgment about how useful one’s data is.

Anyway, sorry for the mini rant. Most of the nation is not yet at a point where we can talk about cool, new technologies, volunteer-generated data is still sometimes relegated to the margins of the regulatory community. We in San Diego have it a bit easier- our data is actually used. So the morals of this blog are:

  1. Good job, California- by being open with volunteer data, we really set the bar for the rest of the country.
  2. Other states need to get their act together and stop putting up ridiculous roadblocks to volunteer-generated data.
  3. Keep your eye out for our new bioassessment program coming next Spring ’14. We’ll be stomping around creeks and collecting bugs. It should be super fun.
Published in Urban Runoff

Tijuana River Valley

Written by San Diego Coastkeeper
The Tijuana River Valley (Valley) has a decades-long history of water quality issues. Significant
improvements in the arena of wastewater treatment have in recent years improved water quality
on both sides of the border. However, storm water flows continue to bring substantial amounts of
sediment and trash and other contaminants into the Valley from sources in both the United States
(U.S.) and Mexico. The sediment and trash pollutants cause water quality impairments, threaten life
and property from flooding, degrade valuable riparian and estuarine habitats, and impact recreational
opportunities for residents and visitors.
In 2008, the San Diego chapter started the No Border sewage Campaign. Through No B.S. we have
raised awareness, outreach and education of this incredibly overwhelming problem. Additionally,
a Network has formed of like-minded organizations. It is through the Network that consensus has
been built and collaboration to address the conservation and restoration of the entire Tijuana River
Watershed. The TJ Watershed is 1,739 square-miles, with ¼ in the US and ¾ in Mexico. The city of
Tijuana is on average about 300 feet higher than Imperial Beach. During the wet winter season, rain
picks up pollutants as it washes across dirt roads, streets and urban canyons in the outskirts of Tijuana,
where tens of thousands live in ramshackle villages called Colonia’s. Population in Tijuana grows
every day. In 1980, there were 500,000 people and in 2013, it is projected there will be more than
2,500,000 much of whom are not hooked up to sewer lines. Population explosion is fueled by jobs at
the maquiladora plants, which thrived after the US ratified NAFTA, the North American Free Trade
Agreement. Rain from a December 17, 2008 storm caused the river to spew an estimated 3 billion
gallons of contaminated water in the Pacific Ocean in one 24 hour period.
Surfrider has been involved with the Border Sewage issue for over a decade fighting to avoid the
negative environmental impacts and public health risks of discharging any raw sewage and debris
directly into the ocean. One of the main goals of Surfrider’s No BS campaign is to eliminate border
sewage/pollution/solid waste/chemicals and sediment that flow across the TJ River during rain events
and are emptied into the ocean during dry events and close the beaches in IB for half the year. Imperial
Beach has a rich and thriving surf culture and has contributed greatly to the history and roots of surfing
in San Diego. The Tijuana Sloughs (pronounced slew) is a world class big wave break that was a gold
standard for heavy-water surfing in Southern California beginning in the late 1930s. The pioneer wave
riders of the Sloughs include local IB Lifeguard legend, Alan “Dempsey” Holder, Peter Cole, Kimble Daun
and Ron “Canoe” Drummond. Today, the massive and imposing waves still break on a serious Northwest
swell but go largely un ridden because the Sloughs act as the unloading dock for the Tijuana River, on
the receiving end of some of the most repulsive water this earth has wrought. The solution can be
achieved if the US works with Mexico rather than pointing blame at Mexico.
As part of our commitment to improve coastal water quality in the border region, Surfrider is committed
to working with other environmental organizations to operate as a strong united front whenever
possible. Volunteers from Surfrider Foundation Blue water Task Force have been heavily involved in
volunteer activities in the Tijuana River Valley. Through a key partnership with San Diego Coastkeeper,
NoBS volunteers have tracked source point pollution during dry and wet weather events. On a monthly
basis, volunteers hike out to three different locations within the Tijuana River Valley and Estuary and
take water samples that are backed by state-approved quality control standards. During the winter
season we collect samples from Dairy Mart Road Bridge, which is the first natural filter for the trash,
sediment and sewage the flows across the border. Volunteers literally walk through piles of plastic,
Styrofoam, tires and trash sometimes as high as 10 feet to get to the shore line and take the samples.
The mud is largely comprised of sediment which also poses as a danger when walking through it. It
is almost as if you are sinking in quicksand. Other sites include Hollister Street Bridge and Saturn
Road, which is next to Suzy’s Farm. These locations are heavily flooded during rain events due to the
hydrology of the River Valley and lifeguard rescues are a common occurrence. During the summer
season, volunteers hike out to 3 locations within the Tijuana Estuary that are further west than the
winter season locations. The first stop is the Visitor center bridge. On any given day you see a variety of
birds and if you are lucky a glimpse of an endangered clapper rail foraging in the pickle weed. Peregrine
falcons, snowy egrets and Blue Herons also frequent overhead as you collect your water samples. From
there we hike out to the Grove Avenue Bridge and the Oneonta Slough River mouth. The River mouth is
about a 4 mile hike and is breathtaking. The smell of saltwater, breathtaking views of the iconic Bullring
and Lighthouse to the south in Mexico and the beautiful downtown San Diego skyline to the north make
this trip a memorable one each and every time. The trail that leads to the Slough River mouth is named
after Dr. Mike McCoy, who spearheaded the 10 year effort to save the estuary from a proposed marina
created by dredging the Tijuana Estuary. He recognized the importance of preserving it and its wildlife as
one of the last intact salt marsh ecosystems in Southern California.

This is part 4 of a 5 part series of results from our water monitoring lab. This post was written by the folks over at Surfrider Foundation, San Diego Chapter. If you haven’t read our watershed report, head over here and check it out. In this fourth part, we are going to take a look at the Tijuana River Valley.

The Tijuana River Valley has a decades-long history of water quality issues. Significant improvements in the arena of wastewater treatment in recent years have improved water quality on both sides of the border. However, storm water continues to bring substantial amounts of sediment and trash and other contaminants into the Valley from sources in both the United States and Mexico. The sediment and trash pollutants cause water quality impairments, threaten life and property from flooding, degrade valuable riparian and estuarine habitats and impact recreational opportunities for residents and visitors.

In 2008, the Surfrider Foundation, San Diego chapter started the No Border sewage Campaign. Through No Border Sewage, we have raised awareness, outreach and education of this incredibly overwhelming problem. Additionally, a network has formed of like-minded organizations. Through this network, consensus and collaboration has been built to address the conservation and restoration of the entire Tijuana River Watershed.

tj_river_trash_2_karen_franz

The Tijuna Watershed is 1,739 square-miles, with one quarter in the US and three quarters in Mexico. The city of Tijuana is on average about 300 feet higher than Imperial Beach. During the wet winter season, rain picks up pollutants as it washes across dirt roads, streets and urban canyons in the outskirts of Tijuana. In these canyons, tens of thousands live in ramshackle villages called Colonia’s. Population in Tijuana grows every day. In 1980, there were 500,000 people, and in 2013, it is projected there will be more than 2,500,000, much of whom are not hooked up to sewer lines. Population explosion is fueled by jobs at the maquiladora plants, which thrived after the US ratified the North American Free Trade Agreement. This explosive growth causes signifigant pollution. For example, rain from a December 17, 2008 storm caused the river to spew an estimated 3 billion gallons of contaminated water into the Pacific Ocean in one 24-hour period.

Surfrider has been involved with the border sewage issue for over a decade, fighting to avoid the negative environmental impacts and public health risks of discharging any raw sewage and debris directly into the ocean. One of the main goals of Surfrider’s No Border Sewage Campaign is to eliminate border sewage, pollution, solid waste, chemicals and sediment that flows across the Tijuana River during rain events. These pollutants are emptied into the ocean during dry events and close the beaches in Imperial Beach for half the year.

Imperial Beach has a rich and thriving surf culture and has contributed greatly to the history and roots of surfing in San Diego. The Tijuana Sloughs (pronounced slew) is a world class big wave break that was a gold standard for heavy-water surfing in Southern California beginning in the late 1930s. The pioneer wave riders of the Sloughs include local IB Lifeguard legend, Alan “Dempsey” Holder, Peter Cole, Kimble Daun and Ron “Canoe” Drummond. Today the massive and imposing waves still break on a serious Northwest swell but go largely un-ridden because the Sloughs act as the unloading dock for the Tijuana River, receiving some of the most repulsive water this earth has wrought. The solution can be achieved if the U.S. works with Mexico rather than pointing blame at Mexico.

As part of our commitment to improve coastal water quality in the border region, Surfrider is committed to working with other environmental organizations to operate as a strong united front whenever possible. Volunteers from Surfrider Foundation Blue Water Task Force have been heavily involved in volunteer activities in the Tijuana River Valley. Through a key partnership with San Diego Coastkeeper, No Border Sewage volunteers have tracked source point pollution during dry and wet weather events. On a monthly basis, volunteers hike out to three different locations within the Tijuana River Valley and Estuary and take water samples that are backed by state-approved quality control standards. During the winter season, we collect samples from Dairy Mart Road Bridge, which is the first natural filter for the trash, sediment and sewage that flows across the border. Volunteers literally walk through piles of plastic, Styrofoam, tires and trash sometimes as high as 10 feet to get to the shore line and take the samples. The mud is largely comprised of sediment which also poses as a danger when walking through it. It is almost as if you are sinking in quicksand. Other sampling site sites include the Hollister Street Bridge and Saturn Road, which are next to Suzy’s Farm. These locations are heavily flooded during rain events due to the hydrology of the River Valley and lifeguard rescues are a common occurrence.

During the summer season, volunteers hike out to three locations within the Tijuana Estuary that are further west than the winter season locations. The first stop is the Visitor Center Bridge. On any given day, you see a variety of birds, and if you are lucky a glimpse of an endangered clapper rail foraging in the pickle weed. Peregrine falcons, Snowy Egrets and Blue Herons also frequent overhead as you collect your water samples. From there, we hike out to the Grove Avenue Bridge and the Oneonta Slough River mouth. The river mouth is about a four mile hike and is breathtaking. The smell of saltwater, breathtaking views of the iconic Bullring and Lighthouse to the south in Mexico and the beautiful downtown San Diego skyline to the north make this trip a memorable one each and every time. The trail that leads to the Slough River mouth is named after Dr. Mike McCoy, who spearheaded the 10-year effort to save the estuary from a proposed marina created by dredging the Tijuana Estuary. He recognized the importance of preserving it and its wildlife as one of the last intact salt marsh ecosystems in Southern California.

 

 

Published in Urban Runoff

Cleaning Up Our La Jolla Storm Drains

Written by San Diego Coastkeeper

A few years ago, the city spent millions on building the City of San Diego Coastal Low Flow Diversion Program. However, the system only works if the City properly maintains it.

During the dry season, low flow street runoff is supposed to be diverted into the sewer system, rather than the storm drains. This keeps what could be polluted water off of our beaches and out of our oceans.

When these drains are clogged, the runoff instead goes straight into the stormwater drains, rather than the sewer. And guess where it ends up.

Yep, the ocean.

A concerned La Jolla citizen emailed us to let us know about a problem with some of these drains. They were almost completely clogged with sand, mud and even some plants. He told us that he saw runoff running onto the beach nearly every morning, and sent pictures showing how bad the problem was.

What’s the point of spending millions of dollars on a system that doesn’t work as planned due to lack of maintenence?

We informed the San Diego Transportation and Stormwater Department, and they quickly sent a crew out to clean up the mess. They were appreciative that the issue was brought to their attention. It’s nice to see a swift response from a government agency.

Issues like this can only be cleared up with cooperation from San Diegans and appropriate government agencies. It’s Coastkeeper’s job to make sure we connect problems with problem solvers, and in this case you can see the result. Pictures show both the before clogged drains, and the after cleared drains.

If this La Jolla resident had never informed us of this issue, runoff could’ve been flowing onto our beaches and entering our oceans for a very long time. Instead, he sent us a quick email, and, at least in this spot, the beaches will remain runoff free.

If you ever see any sort of issue you believe needs addressing, please contact Coastkeeper through our Report Pollution Hotline.

Below, you can see the clogged drains before Coastkeeper was alerted to the problem:

before1

before3

And here, you can see the drains are completely clear of crud after we were told about the issue:

after1

after3

Published in Urban Runoff