Can Kayaking in La Jolla Keep our Water Clean?

This is the fourth of a 10-part blog series examining the nature of ASBS, the threats they face and the actions we can take to protect these biological hotspots for future San Diegans.

Kayaking_Ang

Angela, co-owner of Hike Bike Kayak, looking for leopard sharks in Pinky, the kayak.

Hands down one of the coolest things about San Diego is kayaking in La Jolla.  In fact, when our staff first asked me for my bio for the website, they asked me to answer this question: “What is one thing I wish everyone knew about San Diego?” I promptly answered Adams Avenue Grill in Normal Heights, but kayaking in La Jolla came a very close second. I may be biased since I used to be a guide at Hike Bike Kayak Sports and spent nearly every day on the water teaching others to enjoy what I know now is an Area of Special Biological Significance, but it’s still downright awesome. And you should go . . . soon.

There are lots of scientists at Coastkeeper who can tell you why it’s so significant and special from an ecological point of view, and it’s all very impressive.  But as the only staff member with a bona fide college degree in Outdoor Recreation, what I can tell you is how amazing this area is for all of us to get out and enjoy.

I’ve kayaked so many places from remote Baja, the Amazon, Hawaii, and beyond, and I’d be hard pressed to say I enjoyed any of them more than some of my two hour tours in La Jolla.  I saw grey whales, green sea turtles, sea lions, common dolphins, bottle nose dolphins, blue sharks, angel sharks, a white shark, leopard sharks, limpets, shore crabs, garibaldi, sheapshead fish, harbor seals, skates, rays, guitar fish and the list goes on and on.  And the craziest part of it all is the area I kayak is less than 3 square miles and right outside a major city.

This is all in our backyard folks.  I implore you, if you haven’t already, wait for the tourists to leave, and sometime between Labor

Kayaking_Dave

Dave, co-owner, of Hike Bike Kayak and Water Quality Monitoring Volunteer, gets attacked by the elusive sand shark at La Jolla Shores.

Day and November, get down to my friends at Hike Bike Kayak for a tour.  And when you do, you’ll surely find a new appreciation for the biodiversity right here in San Diego.  With the fantastic guides still going strong at HBK, you will no doubt learn a lesson about how urban runoff continues to be the number one threat to our water quality in San Diego.  

When you come back with your new inspiration, hit me up (dylan@sdcoastkeeper.org) to get involved in protecting our ocean by joining a Coastkeeper program like our new Pollution Patrollers.  Hooray kayaking!

Published in Marine Conservation

Translating state policy into action on the ground (or in the ocean)

This is the third of a 10-part blog series examining the nature of ASBS, the threats they face and the actions we can take to protect these biological hotspots for future San Diegans.

We know from our previous posts that once a coastal area is designated as an ASBS, discharges of any waste into that area are not allowed. That was part of the initial intent of the original 1972 ASBS policy – to protect ‘natural water quality.’ At the time, no areas had been designated. By 1974, key areas of California’s coast were recognized as ‘special’ including the two areas off of La Jolla’s shoreline officially ASBS #29 and ASBS #31.

The newly planted ecology embankment at La Jolla Shores.

The newly planted ecology embankment at La Jolla Shores.
Photo Credit: K. O’Connell

This no-discharge prohibition was codified in 1983 when the State Water Board amended the Ocean Plan to officially prohibit all waste discharges, both point and nonpoint, into ASBS. This was a forward looking and protective decision for marine conservation. Unfortunately, at the time, little was known about the number and types of waste discharges in any ASBS.  It was not until 2001 that the State Water Board discovered that indeed, waste discharges into ASBS were common.

A 2003 statewide survey found 1,654 potential violations along the coast of California, and identified 391 municipal or industrial storm drains that emptied directly into ASBS statewide. This survey found that both of our local ASBS areas were receiving discharges from several sources including the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), Scripps Institution of Oceanography’s (SIO) waste seawater (from research facilities and the Birch Aquarium) and storm water runoff, and the City of San Diego’s discharges from pipes, drainage weeps and storm drains.

To remain in compliance with the Ocean Plan, discharges must be eliminated or specifically granted an exception. The State Board determined that it was in the best public interest to allow UCSD/SIO to continue to discharge but with 19 specific ‘limiting conditions’ to protect the ASBS. This 2004 ‘model exception’ required eliminating copper and formaldehyde from seawater discharges, removing exotic species in discharges, eliminating dry weather discharges from storm drains and extensive monitoring.

In 2005 the La Jolla Shores Watershed Management Group (WMG) was formed to address the ASBS issues raised in the exception process.  The WMG is a collaboration among UCSD/SIO, the City of San Diego, and San Diego Coastkeeper. Together, the WMG crafted an ambitious science-based management plan that spells out actions to protect and enhance water quality in our local ASBS.  In 2008, we finalized the La Jolla Shores Coastal Watershed Management Plan.

Thankfully, this plan is not sitting on a shelf just gathering dust. Already, many of the actions identified in that report have been implemented.  For example, UCSD/SIO has finished installing an ‘ecology embankment’ at La Jolla Shores just north of Scripps Pier. This project has transformed the beach embankment into a stormwater workhorse – by implementing media filters, special ‘amended’ soils and native plants, the area will infiltrate and remove pollutants from dry weather flows and some of the first winter rains, all the while providing habitat for wildlife and adding even more beauty to our coastline. The actions laid out in the Management Plan have increased our understanding of our marine environment around La Jolla and have pushed us towards achieving improved water quality for the coast off La Jolla Shores. In upcoming blogs, we will talk in more detail about many of these actions, what we know so far about their impacts, and spell out how local residents can implement some of these actions at home. Stay tuned!

 

 

 

Published in Marine Conservation

Bathroom Water Quality: What’s in a bowl?

water-quality-sample-fecal

Test results from our homework assignment to show what we’ve learned at Coastkeeper.

On March 15, my co-intern Noah and I had to do a school project that utilizes some things that we have learned and done so far here at San Diego Coastkeeper. As interns, we are responsible for analyzing and producing all the data graphs you see on the water quality wiki. We decided to measure the bacteria count in the water in our bathrooms. Once we had the results, we would then compare our two houses to each other and to the bacteria levels in the waters around San Diego County.

Once Noah and I collected some water samples from our sink, toilet bowl and the toilet tank, Travis, Coastkeeper’s water quality lab coordinator, helped us analyze for E. coli and enteroccoci.

The results were somewhat surprising. All results were below the minimum level that the test can show, with the exception of samples taken from one of our toilet bowls (the actual owner to remain anonymous). One of our toilet bowls showed an E. coli level of 648.8 MPN/100 ml. This level of EColi is comparable to the February results from one of the Tijuana River sites. According to the field data sheet, the sample site also contains “lots of trash (including: a bowling ball, a boat, 3 deflated soccer balls, Styrofoam).”

Feel free to check out water quality data for other watersheds in San Diego. And read more about “gross water” on Coastkeeper’s blog.

Green Family Fun on Earth Day

Make Earth Day a family holiday with these environmental and fun activities:

Family_picnic1)       Make a picnic. Use reusable containers, make sandwiches with tasty organic vegetables and greens and bring non-plastic water bottles. But, most importantly, have fun! Choose your favorite park with fresh mountain or ocean air and enjoy the unity of you, your family and nature. For some more comfort, bring a 100 percent cotton blanket.

2)       Do your own beach cleanup. If you want to go right to action, bring your whole family together for your own beach cleanup. San Diego Coastkeeper has Beach Cleanup in a Box, a do-it-yourself program that will give you all the tools needed to organize your cleanup.

3)   Plant a tree. Start appreciating nature and Earth directly through planting a small tree and taking care of it with the whole family. This rewarding and uniting family activity will be a reminder in your backyard of joy and nurture that our planet gives us.

4)       Bike to local park/beach. Reduce emissions, enjoy fresh air and get exercise by biking to the local beach or park. Take the whole family with you and bond through the breeze!

5)       Water activities. We are lucky to be so close to the ocean. Use it when you can! If the water is warm enough for you, get in for a swim. But if you are not as cold-blooded, try out kayaking and put one a wetsuit to try surfing.

6) Don’t forget to practice conserving energy together in your household. On Earth Day, try not to watch TV and get outside. Turn off computers completely and unplug unnecessary appliances. When leaving the room, turn the light off. Remind yourself and others how important it is to not only be aware of sustainability, but also practice it every day.

San Diego Council members see benefit of water purification votes

The Environmental Quality Report Card series examines environmental stewardship of San Diego Councilmembers and the Mayor. The series looks at history of past reports, shows the voting record of individual Councilmembers, explains voting methodology and examines the environmental issues the Councilmembers voted on.

On Wednesday of this week, a coalition of environmental nonprofits will release their second annual Environmental Quality Report Card for the City of San Diego.
Last year’s Report Card made quite a splash.  (It is available online from the League of Conservation Voters San Diego.)  The Mayor and most of the City Council received fairly terrible grades. The media covered it extensively, and it even got some Councilmembers running scared.
But that’s the whole point.  The Report Card is intended to shine a spotlight on the environmental records of the Mayor and City Council, so that the public and the voters can demand they do better.
The Environmental Quality Report Card is actually an outgrowth of the Water Quality Report Card that San Diego Coastkeeper published annually, starting in 2001. From year to year, the Water Quality Report Card measured a statistical improvement in voting behavior for City officials, especially if they received a poor grade during their first year on the council.
In 2009, a coalition of environmental organizations adopted Coastkeeper’s report, and expanded it to quantitatively grade city officials on the full spectrum of environmental issues (including water quality). It continues to be our hope that with greater scrutiny, the City of San Diego will produce better environmental policy.
While the Report Card is commissioned by environmental nonprofits, the report is compiled by Strategic Community Consulting, an independent consulting firm staffed by UCSD graduate students at the School of International Relations and Pacific Studies. The consultants keep the Report Card objective and independent, and they bring to bear considerable rigor to their quantitative analysis of Council grades.
You’ll have to wait for Wednesday to find out how the Council and Mayor scored in 2010.  But I can tell you that the historical trends have continued, and most officials who scored poorly in 2009, improved in 2010. Some improved a lot.  But others have failed to treat conservation as anything more than a buzzword for their campaign mailers.
So stay tuned!  Copies of the 2010 report card will be available online at the website of the League of Conservation Voters after 11 a.m. on April 20, 2011. (http://www.lcvsd.net).
PS:  We’ll also be tweeting about the Report Card before and after its release by using the hash tag #EQRC.
sewagelandingpage-s

Point Loma Sewage Treatment Facility photographed by Lighthawk and Matthew Meier Photography

Have you seen the 2010 Environmental Quality Report Card for the City of San Diego?  As you can see, one of the success stories last year was the Council’s approach to Indirect Potable Reuse.  This process of water purification recycles wastewater into water so clean that it can augment our reservoirs and help increase our drinking water supplies.

Once the third rail of San Diego politics, water purification became much more palatable at City Hall due to continuing periods of drought and budget shortfalls.  The purification process gives us a local source of water at a time when our imported sources are literally drying up.  A decade ago the process was tagged with the misnomer toilet-to-tap, and written off as politically unpopular.  But science ultimately convinced a majority of council members to revisit reuse. 

There were two important votes in San Diego last year on IPR.  The first, in January, authorized a contract for public outreach and project management of a demonstration project for advanced water purification.   It passed with five councilmember votes and a positive staff report from the Mayor.  The second vote in July actually passed with six votes, authorizing the contract to design and build the demonstration-scale facility.  The test plant will operate at the North City Water Reclamation Plant, where the City will gather data to plan a permanent full-scale project. 

The (not-so) strange part?  Opposition to last year’s votes was almost non-existent.  An unprecedented coalition of more than twenty groups supporting water purification was one reason, public outreach and education was another.  The Union-Tribune’s editorial support this year may have been belated, but it gave one more boost to council members who know that caring about water quality is the right thing in popular and unpopular times.  And for those that did, the Environmental Quality Report Card took note.

 

The Environmental Quality Report Card: What is it?

The Environmental Quality Report Card series examines environmental stewardship of San Diego Councilmembers and the Mayor. The series looks at history of past reports, shows the voting record of individual Councilmembers, explains voting methodology and examines the environmental issues the Councilmembers voted on.

On Wednesday of this week, a coalition of environmental nonprofits will release their second annual Environmental Quality Report Card for the City of San Diego.
Last year’s Report Card made quite a splash.  (It is available online from the League of Conservation Voters San Diego.)  The Mayor and most of the City Council received fairly terrible grades. The media covered it extensively, and it even got some Councilmembers running scared.
But that’s the whole point.  The Report Card is intended to shine a spotlight on the environmental records of the Mayor and City Council, so that the public and the voters can demand they do better.
The Environmental Quality Report Card is actually an outgrowth of the Water Quality Report Card that San Diego Coastkeeper published annually, starting in 2001. From year to year, the Water Quality Report Card measured a statistical improvement in voting behavior for City officials, especially if they received a poor grade during their first year on the council.
In 2009, a coalition of environmental organizations adopted Coastkeeper’s report, and expanded it to quantitatively grade city officials on the full spectrum of environmental issues (including water quality). It continues to be our hope that with greater scrutiny, the City of San Diego will produce better environmental policy.
While the Report Card is commissioned by environmental nonprofits, the report is compiled by Strategic Community Consulting, an independent consulting firm staffed by UCSD graduate students at the School of International Relations and Pacific Studies. The consultants keep the Report Card objective and independent, and they bring to bear considerable rigor to their quantitative analysis of Council grades.
You’ll have to wait for Wednesday to find out how the Council and Mayor scored in 2010.  But I can tell you that the historical trends have continued, and most officials who scored poorly in 2009, improved in 2010. Some improved a lot.  But others have failed to treat conservation as anything more than a buzzword for their campaign mailers.
So stay tuned!  Copies of the 2010 report card will be available online at the website of the League of Conservation Voters after 11 a.m. on April 20, 2011. (http://www.lcvsd.net).
PS:  We’ll also be tweeting about the Report Card before and after its release by using the hash tag #EQRC.

 

San Diego environmental groups announce results of first-ever Environmental Quality Report Card for San Diego Mayor and City Council on March 10, 2010. Photo credit by Ed Joyce, KPBS.

On Wednesday of this week, a coalition of environmental nonprofits will release their second annual Environmental Quality Report Card for the City of San Diego.

Last year’s Report Card made quite a splash and is available at League of Conservation Voters website.  The Mayor and most of the City Council received fairly terrible grades. The media covered it extensively, and it even got some Councilmembers running scared.

But that’s the whole point.  The Report Card is intended to shine a spotlight on the environmental records of the Mayor and City Council, so that the public and the voters can demand they do better.

The Environmental Quality Report Card is actually an outgrowth of the Water Quality Report Card that San Diego Coastkeeper published annually, starting in 2001. From year to year, the Water Quality Report Card measured a statistical improvement in voting behavior for City officials, especially if they received a poor grade during their first year on the council.

In 2009, a coalition of environmental organizations adopted Coastkeeper’s report, and expanded it to quantitatively grade city officials on the full spectrum of environmental issues (including water quality). It continues to be our hope that with greater scrutiny, the City of San Diego will produce better environmental policy.

While the Report Card is commissioned by environmental nonprofits, the report is compiled by Strategic Community Consulting, an independent consulting firm staffed by UCSD graduate students at the School of International Relations and Pacific Studies. The consultants keep the Report Card objective and independent, and they bring to bear considerable rigor to their quantitative analysis of Council grades.

You’ll have to wait for Wednesday to find out how the Council and Mayor scored in 2010.  But I can tell you that the historical trends have continued, and most officials who scored poorly in 2009, improved in 2010. Some improved a lot. But others have failed to treat conservation as anything more than a buzzword for their campaign mailers.

So stay tuned!  Copies of the 2010 report card will be available online at the website of the League of Conservation Voters after 11 a.m. on April 20, 2011.

 

PS:  We’ll also be tweeting about the Report Card before and after its release by using the hash tag #EQRC.

Coastkeeper goes International – Talking Trash in Hawaii

At the end of March 2011, I was fortunate to spend five days immersed in plastic pollution and marine debris at the 5th International Marine Debris Conference in Honolulu, Hawai’i.  Hosted by NOAA and the United Nations Environment Program , 450 truly dedicated researchers, educators, policy folk, industry, agencies, and artists who are actively working to highlight the problem of trash in the ocean all came together for the first time in ten years. In addition to putting smiling faces to big names in the field of marine debris , I presented about Coastkeeper’s beach cleanup data , our leadership in waste reduction at cleanups, and our education efforts including Signs of the Tide and Project SWELL .

I learned a lot, and am highlighting some key points for you below:
1.    There is a LOT of trash and plastic out there. As the Ocean Conservancy released their 25-year report on Coastal Cleanup Day highlighting the removal of millions of pounds of trash, other operations were reporting tons of fishing gear washing up on remote islands in the Bering Sea, and sea turtles pooping plastic bags for a month . Perhaps marine microbes burrowing into plastic are contributing to the breakdown of floating debris, but it’s still a massive problem deserving our attention and action.

2.   Science is the key to marine debris solutions. While there are many excellent scientists studying marine debris and its impacts, there are many gaps in research and needs for information to better inform policy change. Even citizen science is going to be essential – and collecting data at our beach cleanups is an important piece of the puzzle for identifying problem items and reducing debris at sea.

3.    The plastics industry MUST be at the table, but we can’t let them put their fingers in everything. While they may tout their commitment to reducing marine debris , representatives of single-use plastic makers will again and again state that recycling and education are the solutions to reducing marine debris. We all know that these things are a part of the effort, but source reduction and better pollution policies will get us to zero discharge a heck of a lot faster. Unfortunately, with a lot of money on the line, they can also pay to hire biased people to write the reports about marine debris and even sway the focus of government agencies and large organizations towards undertaking only activities that will not harm the bottom line of their member industries. Even if that means continued plastic pollution .

4.    Even plastic pollution can be reused – as a piece of art. Dozens of marine debris artists converged at the conference to showcase their unique way of reaching the public: art. We are supporting this work locally by collecting funky trash for local artist Teresa Espaniola , who hosted a workshop at the conference. Stay tuned for more art projects in our future.

One of the outcomes of the conference is still currently under construction: a Honolulu Strategy for the reduction of marine debris. An international framework for action, this document is taking input from all conference attendees and creating guidelines for future action. With all the energy in the room when Jack Johnson closed out the conference with a live performance of his Reduce Reuse Recycle Song, there is hope that the marine debris community will continue to collaborate for solutions and strive for zero input of plastics to the ocean. There is hope.

 

Published in Marine Debris

March Monitoring Madness

index_basketballAs a loud and proud alumnus of San Diego State University, this is an incredibly exciting time for me.  Our beloved Aztecs are headed into the Sweet 16 with ambitions of a final four appearance and dare I say national championship.  I’ve been an avid fan of SDSU basketball since I moved here nine years ago, and while I’ve always been proud to be a part of the program (three time fan of the games a student . . . no big deal), this year is already a huge success for us.

Needless to say, this March has been the bees knees.  And to top it all off, I’m also super excited to kick of our 2011 World Water Monitoring Program with the hope that this year will be better than ever. . .just like our boys in black and red.

But we need help.  We need teachers and educators, from anywhere in San Diego County, to organize your class to help us gather data from around the county.  We’ll provide you free water quality testing kits, help you choose a location (inland or coastal), and provide you with info on all the parameters you test for.  We’ll even submit your data to the global WWMD program.

It’s a great way for students to learn about San Diego water quality and how they can help to improve our local environment. You’re also helping out the global campaign to protect our waterways.  With your help, we may even win the coveted Water Champion Award.

I BELIEVE THAT WE WILL WIN!

Volunteering to become the heart and soul of Coastkeeper

“We never know the worth of water till the well is dry.”
– Thomas Fuller, Gnomologia, 1732

volunteer-san-diego-coastkeeper-taya

San Diego Coastkeeper’s Volunteer of the Year Amanda Sousa and Volunteer Hall of Fame inductee Taya Lazootin checking out San Diego Bay water quality while aboard Clean Sweep.

It wasn’t until the first time I snorkeled off the shore of Catalina Island as a teenager that I was able to completely grasp the beauty and wonder of the ocean I had been swimming in my entire life.  With that awakening came a greater love and appreciation for the sea, resulting in continuous efforts today to bridge the gap between existence and contribution within my community, my students and myself.  In a lifetime we may learn the value of natural resources in San Diego , yet, as former historian Thomas Fuller states in the quote above, it is often too late.

This is probably one of the main reasons I joined San Diego Coastkeeper in September of 2010.  I started out as a water monitoring volunteer, journeying throughout the county to collect water samples from various watersheds that were later to be tested in lab.  The first water quality monitoring training provided a great perspective on what goes on behind the scenes at San Diego Coastkeeper; and yet, it was less of a “training” and more of a “hands on” learning experience that instilled the desire to be part of a team.

Wanting to be more involved, within a few months, I joined the Volunteer Core, where I not only met interesting people with similar interests to my own, but I learned from many amazing speakers about conservation methods and sustainability practices that are presented at outreach events and beach cleanups.  As a teacher, I see the immediate effects of outreach events and the long term effects of educational resources, and I want more than anything for our youth to gain perspective on conservation and preservation.  

While each volunteer creates their own custom plan for getting involved, one of my biggest highlights so far was teaming up with the Coastkeeper staff to create a Marine Protected Area Education Project in my school district.  Students in my school district were educated on the Marine Life Protection Act and given the unique opportunity to present California Kelp Ecosystem Projects at the California Fish and Game Hearing on MPA expansion this past October, assisting in the resolution for increased Marine Protected Areas along our coast. Yay!!

Taking one day out of your hectic week to be part of Coastkeeper will make you feel enriched and as though you play a major role in the ongoing trek to promote conservation and stimulate public awareness, just as it does for me.  The many new friends I have made and resources I have been introduced to make it attainable to fulfill my goal of being a successful steward for my environment, and I truly believe this would not be possible had I not made myself at home with San Diego Coastkeeper!

Contact the Dylan, Volunteer and Outreach Coordiantor, to learn more about this amazing program.

If Only We Knew: Bishop’s 6th Grade Hits the Beach with Gloves and Trash Bags

Christina Gaffney (’17) waved her latex-gloved hand at the black water and pieces of trash flowing from a storm drain at Mission Bay Park. “See that?” she said. “I want to help stop that.”

bishopIn December, the Bishop’s 6th grade class joined forces with San Diego Coastkeeperto sweep the beach, collect garbage, and record data on their findings. Within an hour, students collected 41.75 pounds of trash: 307 cigarette butts, 261 pieces of Styrofoam, 189 plastic food wrappers, and 108 plastic bags, among other more exotic pieces of refuse like a pair of navy blue cargo pants, a toy seahorse, a dead duck, and a kite-sized piece of fiber glass, which 6th grader Nico Langlois fished out of the bay as his classmates held onto his limbs to keep him from plunging headfirst into the water.

Data recorder Katie Maysent (’17) explained, “It is important to record data on the garbage we find. If we know all the things going into the ocean, we can know what to recycle and reuse so they don’t go into the storm drains.” San Diego Coastkeeper, the region’s largest professional organization protecting San Diego’s inland and coastal waterways, uses cleanup data to communicate pollution prevention needs to decision makers.

The experience was an eye-opener for these students. Who knew that seemingly innocuous debris discarded miles inland – candy wrappers, cigarette butts, and Styrofoam bits the size of fingertips – can wreak so much damage on our coastal ecosystem? But that’s exactly what is happening, according to San Diego Coastkeeper, the county’s largest professional environmental organization protecting the region’s inland and coastal waters for the communities and wildlife that depend on them. Alicia Glassco, Marine Debris CoordinatorProgram Manager, taught the students that litter and trash blown inadvertently by the wind makes its way to the coast from storm drains, canyons, creeks, and rivers. But the scary part is what happens when it reaches the ocean.

bishop2Researchers estimate that 60-80 percent of all marine debris, and 90 percent of floating debris, is plastic. Plastic and Styrofoam are petroleum-based products that take hundreds of years to break down in the marine environment. Instead of biodegrading, plastic breaks into smaller and smaller, sometimes microscopic, pieces. Currents transport this plastic soup to a large gyre in the center of the open ocean, where it is accumulating in a so-called “Garbage Patch.” Here, plastic pieces can outnumber plankton by a ratio of 6:1. This number is likely increasing. The plastic looks like plankton, so fish consume it. Either the fish die or get consumed by something else, thereby transmitting the toxic petroleum on up the food chain.

The implications are dire for our oceans and ourselves, and sometimes it seems that the problem is too big, but as the 6th graders learned, hope lies in each of us. One of the goals of San Diego Coastkeeper is to educate the public and provide opportunities for it to help.  We can become members of and donate to this and other organizations whose mission is to protect our environment. We can volunteer. We can stay informed; knowledge is power. And we can vote accordingly. We can change our own habits – lead by example, carry cloth shopping bags, pick up after ourselves, get metal water bottles instead of buying plastic, use less water, think before we fertilize, reduce, reuse, recycle, ride our bikes, remember and teach that plastic lasts forever.

Bishop’s tries to teach its students that they can make a difference in this world. Small changes help. Spread the word.