What are San Diego Businesses Doing to Conserve Water?

Written by Kristin Kuhn

Still reeling after our most recent multi-year drought, many San Diegans have decided to carry their water-saving practices forward, for good. During the drought, what used to be a mundane, taken-for-granted resource was now frequently front-page news. As a result, many of us felt a fundamental shift in the way we think about, talk about, and use, water. So, our showers are still shorter, our yards are now more richly landscaped with vibrant, hearty native plants, and we still care about what else is being done to conserve.

Residential water use makes up just over half our region’s overall consumption. That said, there are still many other areas where conservation can play an impactful role. Here at Coastkeeper, we found ourselves wondering, what are some of our local commercial and other non-residential spaces doing? Conservation practices on the commercial level can make a big impact on our region’s overall water use. Here are some examples of businesses and other organizations taking the lead.

  1. Hotel Indigo
    San Diego’s first LEED-certified boutique hotel, Hotel Indigo has a number of practices in place that enhance the sustainability of its operations. Those that help save water – and benefit water quality – include the use of drought-tolerant native plants and high-efficiency irrigation in their landscaping, and green roofs that help filter urban runoff. Learn more about their sustainable practices
    here.

  2. Stone Brewing
    From landscaping their famous beer gardens with low-water plants, to featuring a comprehensive and thoughtful
    Meatless Monday menu once a week, to using an on-site water reclamation system to reuse wastewater, Stone is a regional leader in putting commercial conservation practices in place.

  3. Balboa Park
    The green heart of our city recently underwent some major efficiency upgrades that will reduce the park’s water consumption by about 2.4 million gallons a year. The changes made included the installation of hundreds of more efficient water fixtures across park restrooms, and upgrading the kitchens in nine historic buildings. Learn more about the overhaul
    here.

  4. Snooze, an A.M. Eatery
    This Denver-based brunch spot has three locations in our neck of the woods (La Jolla, Del Mar, and Hillcrest). They might be most popular for their pineapple upside down pancakes, but behind the scenes, Snooze has a number of environmental initiatives in practice, and even dedicates the whole month of June each year to educating their patrons about water conservation. Learn more
    here.

  5. Napizza Little Italy
    At this location, Napizza conserves water by using a low-flow pre-rinse sprayer on their dishes, before popping them into an Energy Star dishwashing machine. Aerators on handwashing and prep sinks reduce use further, making Napizza a great place to grab a slice. Did we mention they use local veggies on their pies, too? Yum. Learn more
    here.

So, next time you need a staycation, consider checking into the Hotel Indigo, then taking a nice picnic of beer, pizza, and pancakes into Balboa Park.

 

What does a year of better water really mean? – San Diego Coastkeeper 2016 Water Quality Report

Written by Meredith Meyers

 

For the first time since 2013, some of our watersheds scored “Good” on the Water Quality Index and many of our watershed scores improved significantly from scores over the last few years, but we can’t get too excited. One year of improvement isn’t enough to say for sure that water quality is improving overall, and we still see lots of occasions where excessive pollution is impacting our inland waters.

This one-year snapshot highlights why our long-term water quality monitoring efforts are so important. By continuing to collect data over the long term, our program contributes to a better understanding of the impacts of factors such as climate, land-use changes and restoration efforts on water quality in our region.

The Volunteer Scientists That Made This Possible

In 2016, 152 volunteer Water Quality Monitors spent a collective 1,908 hours collecting and analyzing water samples from across San Diego County. 

That work truly matters, making a difference that reverberates for generations. Our government doesn’t have the resources to keep as close an eye on our water as we do. Without San Diego Coastkeeper and the dedication of our Water Quality Monitors, the health of our inland waters would be even more of a mystery and even more difficult to manage and improve.

Our 2016 Water Quality Report, which we share with decision-makers across the region to inform better policy, wouldn’t exist without volunteers and donors like you.

  • Find out how your neighborhood watershed scored in 2016 below
  • Sign up to become a trained Water Quality Monitor
  • Donate to fuel San Diego’s clean water movement

Why Did Our Water Improve For The First Time in Five Years?  

Urban runoff continues to be the largest factor impacting people’s ability to safely fish and swim in San Diego County. Rain takes pollution from the surfaces of our streets into our storm drains, where it travels through to our rivers and streams and ultimately, to the Pacific Ocean. As a result, the overwhelming majority of San Diego’s waterways fail to the meet water quality standards that make them safe for recreation.

Though the cause of last year’s improved results can’t be directly identified, and we caution against giving too much credit to any one theory, we do have one idea about why water quality looked a little better in 2016.

Temporary water conservation regulations, implemented in response to the drought, may have helped water quality improve. When we prioritize our environment and water conservation over our front yard lawns, we reduce fertilizer use and fewer lawn sprinklers overflow onto our sidewalks. This may seem small when you think about a couple sprinklers, but San Diegan’s across the county stopped watering their lawns by the thousands. That meant less pollution washing from the street into our rivers and streams. It’s impossible to know for sure, but this one idea makes sense.

Click below to check your watershed’s report card.

Read the specific water quality scores for each of these tested watersheds below.

  

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Published in Urban Runoff

Water Quality 2016: San Diego River Watershed

Written by Devon Lantry

How to read our water quality pie charts:  these handy charts are designed to give you a sense of which of the factors we measured contributed to the overall water quality score (the number in the center) for each watershed. The size/color of the pie slice gets larger/warmer with increased frequency and magnitude of deviations from good water quality standards for each indicator.

San Diego River Watershed’s Score For 2016: 72, Fair 

The San Diego watershed stretches from the Cuyamaca Mountains in the east, to the Pacific Ocean in the west, and includes parts of Julian, Alpine, Lakeside, El Cajon, Santee, La Mesa, and San Diego. Nutrient levels were often elevated in our 2016 samples, especially phosphorus, an important factor in stream health. Freshwater streams are often phosphorus limited. This means that a major factor holding back excessive algae growth is a shortage of phosphorus relative to other nutrients in the water. The addition of phosphorus to a phosphorus-limited stream can result in eutrophication, a likely scenario here supported by the occasionally very low levels of dissolved oxygen we measured. Phosphorus can be naturally occurring through the erosion of rocks, but lawn fertilizers and detergents are common human sources.

 

 

 

 

 

Published in Urban Runoff

Water Quality 2016: Tijuana Watershed

Written by Meredith Meyers

Water Quality Index Score: N/A

We’ve suspended our sampling in the Tijuana watershed for now.  We know that when it is flowing, the river is highly polluted with untreated sewage, and we’d like to keep our volunteers safe!

Published in Urban Runoff

Water Quality 2016: Rose Creek Watershed

Written by Meredith Meyers

Water Quality Index Score: 87, Good

The Rose Creek watershed, containing Rose and San Clemente Creeks, includes parts of Scripps Ranch, Miramar, Kearny Mesa, University City, Clairemont Mesa, La Jolla, and Pacific Beach. Of all the watersheds we monitor, Rose Creek had the highest water quality index score in 2016. This is mainly because nutrient levels were rarely elevated. Fecal indicator bacteria were still occasionally high though, concerning because this watershed drains into Mission Bay, a major recreational destination.

How to read our water quality pie charts:  these handy charts are designed to give you a sense of which of the factors we measured contributed to the overall water quality score (the number in the center) for each watershed. The size/color of the pie slice gets larger/warmer with increased frequency and magnitude of deviations from good water quality standards for each indicator.

Published in Urban Runoff

Water Quality 2016: Sweetwater Watershed

Written by Meredith Meyers

Water Quality Index Score: 74, Fair (20 point improvement from 2015)

The Sweetwater watershed begins in Cuyamaca Rancho State Park in the east and collects runoff from parts of Alpine, Spring Valley, La Mesa, Lemon Grove, San Diego, National City, and Chula Vista before draining into San Diego Bay.  We’re happy to report the Sweetwater River improved in several key indicators compared to our 2015 results, including ammonia and fecal indicator bacteria — although we still saw numerous exceedances of FIB throughout the year.  Dissolved oxygen levels were still very low for most of the year at our site off Plaza Bonita Road, likely caused by excess organic matter being broken down by bacteria in the slow-moving water.

How to read our water quality pie charts:  these handy charts are designed to give you a sense of which of the factors we measured contributed to the overall water quality score (the number in the center) for each watershed. The size/color of the pie slice gets larger/warmer with increased frequency and magnitude of deviations from good water quality standards for each indicator.

Published in Urban Runoff

Water Quality 2016: San Dieguito Watershed

Written by Meredith Meyers

Water Quality Index Score: 78, Fair

The San Dieguito watershed begins in the mountains north of Julian and includes parts of Ramona, Escondido, Rancho Bernardo, Solana Beach, and Del Mar.  Our monitoring data indicated that water quality was fair in the San Dieguito Watershed.  Like most of the sites our program watches over each month, fecal bacteria counts were often elevated, with 50% of the samples collected in this watershed in 2016 exceeding the water quality standard for Enterococcus.

How to read our water quality pie charts:  these handy charts are designed to give you a sense of which of the factors we measured contributed to the overall water quality score (the number in the center) for each watershed. The size/color of the pie slice gets larger/warmer with increased frequency and magnitude of deviations from good water quality standards for each indicator.

Published in Urban Runoff

Water Quality 2016: Pueblo Watershed

Written by Meredith Meyers

Water Quality Index Score: 56, Marginal

The small, urban Pueblo watershed includes parts of the cities of La Mesa, Lemon Grove, National City, and San Diego.  Home to Chollas and Palleta Creeks, the watershed drains the most highly developed parts our region into San Diego Bay.  Water quality in these creeks is highly impacted by urban runoff; with many of the indicators we measure regularly exceeding the water quality standards.  The volunteers also note that the sites they visit each month are consistently plagued with large volumes of trash.

How to read our water quality pie charts:  these handy charts are designed to give you a sense of which of the factors we measured contributed to the overall water quality score (the number in the center) for each watershed. The size/color of the pie slice gets larger/warmer with increased frequency and magnitude of deviations from good water quality standards for each indicator.

Published in Urban Runoff

Water Quality 2016: Otay Watershed

Written by Meredith Meyers

 

Water Quality Index Score: 70, Fair

The Otay watershed is the southernmost watershed we monitored this year.  The portion of the watershed drained by the Otay River includes parts of unincorporated San Diego County, Chula Vista, and San Diego before the river reaches the southern end of San Diego Bay. Both types of indicator bacteria were frequently elevated and were the main contributor to the “Fair” grade in 2016. Nitrate levels were also well above good water quality thresholds, especially towards the end of the year, a trend that has continued into 2017 and we’re keeping an eye on now.

How to read our water quality pie charts:  these handy charts are designed to give you a sense of which of the factors we measured contributed to the overall water quality score (the number in the center) for each watershed. The size/color of the pie slice gets larger/warmer with increased frequency and magnitude of deviations from good water quality standards for each indicator.

Published in Urban Runoff

Water Quality 2016: Los Peñasquitos Watershed

Written by Meredith Meyers

Water Quality Index Score: 76, Fair

The Los Peñasquitos watershed originates in the foothills near Iron Mountain, and includes the communities of Poway, Mira Mesa, Sorrento Valley, and parts of Carmel Valley, Scripps Ranch, and Del Mar.  Precipitation and runoff is funneled through Los Peñasquitos Lagoon before reaching the Pacific Ocean. Our water quality results in 2016 were fair, with ammonia and phosphorus the main pollutants of concern. These excess nutrients often enter waterways in runoff from fertilized lawns and waste discharges.

How to read our water quality pie charts:  these handy charts are designed to give you a sense of which of the factors we measured contributed to the overall water quality score (the number in the center) for each watershed. The size/color of the pie slice gets larger/warmer with increased frequency and magnitude of deviations from good water quality standards for each indicator.

Published in Urban Runoff