PDF

Our Story

San_Diego_Coastkeeper_historyOur StoryOur Mission

San Diego Coastkeeper protects and restores fishable, swimmable and drinkable waters in San Diego County.

Our Vision

Swimmable, fishable and drinkable waters throughout San Diego County.

Our Values

In striving to achieve our mission, San Diego Coastkeeper seeks always (in all ways) to be:

  • Impactful: Addressing the root issues affecting our inland and coastal waters with a solutions-oriented approach that recognizes the connections between people and the natural world
  • Thoughtful: Basing our decisions and actions on the best available scientific, legal and public policy rationale, while being respectful of those who disagree with our views
  • Courageous: Being a zealous advocate for those positions we believe are right and necessary, even when unpopular
  • Transparent: Providing the public with the rationale for our decisions and actions in a straightforward fashion to help raise the level of public discourse about the important issues in which we engage
  • Innovative: Harnessing the power of San Diego's high tech and academic communities to develop and implement novel solutions to environmental problems
  • Collaborative: Engaging broad-based coalitions in our work to enhance effectiveness while empowering local communities to steward our shared environment
  • Passionate: Caring about the work we do and the waters we protect, ensuring that generations to come will be able to better enjoy the region's resources
  • Exemplary: Serving as role models for protecting the environment in both our personal and professional lives

Our Plan

Download San Diego Coastkeeper's 2012-2015 strategic plan to learn more about our goals and what San Diego waters and communities have to look forward to.

Our History

The concept of Waterkeeper dates to a 19th-century English tradition, where Riverkeepers physically guarded private streams to ensure waters remained healthy and free of poachers. In 1982, Hudson River fisherman became concerned about the modern poacher: pollution. They started the first Waterkeeper organization in the United States, and proved so effective at protecting water resources that Waterkeeper organizations trickled throughout the country.

Once established, we became the 15th Waterkeeper organization in the country and focused our efforts on local, community-based advocacy. We began in 1995 as a two-person team combating the chronic pollution and toxic dumping into San Diego Bay, hence our original name: San Diego Baykeeper. Today, as San Diego Coastkeeper, we continue our roll as the region's clean water watchdogs as we help the identify solutions to a new myriad problems such as water supply challenges and urban runoff. 

img_1615-copy-sPhoto Credit Kevin Roche

We use community outreach, education and advocacy to empower San Diegans to guard their clean water and healthy ecosystem, relying on you to help us find and fix pollution hazards. Our team of scientists, activists, educators and lawyers work with our community and decision-makers to protect and restore fishable, swimmable and drinkable water in San Diego County.

Today, San Diego Coastkeeper is a proud member of the California Coastkeeper Alliance as well as the International Waterkeeper Alliance. On both a state and a global level, our alliances connect and support Waterkeeper organizations as a voice for clean water and healthy communities. The International Waterkeeper Alliance, headed by Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., stands nearly 200 programs strong- making it one of the world's fastest growing environmental movements.

Community support and involvement has transformed us into the organization we are today—just take a look at our long list of accomplishments. Please continue to empower us on social media and follow our blog to keep up with events, opportunities to take action and sharing of environmental wisdom. If this isn't enough, check out ways you can get involved.

 

Take Action

Donate Now

Donate to San Diego Coastkeeper

Donate to San Diego Coastkeeper

With you, we can protect San Diego’s aquatic playgrounds. Gifts of every size help us defend your salty seas and beautiful bays. From test tubes in our lab to hands-on...

Read more

Become a Member

IMG_7706

Start Coastkeeping. Become a member today and protect and restore swimmable, fishable and drinkable waters in San Diego County.

 

Report a Problem

plastic-beach-feat
Catch the Polluters

If you see someone pollute, report it to Coastkeeper. Let us help you protect your waters.

Attend an Event

Get the News

Read our Blog

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
Prev Next

More San Diego Teachers Are Getting SWEL…

More San Diego Teachers Are Getting SWELL!

Project SWELL has been busy preparing San Diego’s future leaders to understand the role of water in our region and in our future by preparing those who teach them to...

The Water Authority Misses the Mark...Ag…

The Water Authority Misses the Mark...Again

It probably won’t surprise you that as San Diego Coastkeeper’s Waterkeeper I spend a lot of my time thinking about water- the best sources, the best methods and the best...

Educators Come Together to Discuss Scien…

Educators Come Together to Discuss Science Curricula, Including Project Swell

San Diego Coastkeeper recently had the exciting opportunity to take part in the San Diego Science Educators Association conference. The conference serves as an opportunity for educators of all grade...

Tank that Leak: A Quick Fix to Save Wate…

Tank that Leak: A Quick Fix to Save Water

"Fix A Leak Week" ended. I'm pretty sure that some of us still have a leak or two that can be fixed, though, and that will save thousands upon thousands...

Single Use Can Mean Permanent Harm

Single Use Can Mean Permanent Harm

After every beach cleanup we are hit with ample evidence of the ubiquity of paper and plastic products in our everyday lives. It is quite clear that these products are...

What A Waste: The Hidden Waste of Water …

What A Waste: The Hidden Waste of Water Leaks

Did you know that March 17-23 is Fix a Leak Week? Sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, this week brings attention to water leaks, which are a serious concern, especially...

San Diego's Waters Deserve Our Best

San Diego's Waters Deserve Our Best

The following was written by Coastkeeper’s Jo Brooks and Everett Delano of our board of directors in response to a February 23 U-T San Diego editorial that criticized stormwater runoff...

What's A Little Rain When You Have A Mys…

What's A Little Rain When You Have A Mystery to Solve?

Despite the stormy Friday morning weather, my water quality partner and I were excited to get to the bottom of a still unsolved mystery—the sources of urban runoff. Because rain...

Weather Doesn't Dampen Resolve to Get An…

Weather Doesn't Dampen Resolve to Get Answers

While most of you were trying to stay dry and cozy during this past storm, several intrepid volunteers offered to brave the elements and help us figure out the source...

Project SWELL Inspires Students & Te…

Project SWELL Inspires Students & Teachers Alike

When should you start your environmental education? No matter what your age, the answer is always right now! At a recent Project SWELL workshop, San Diego area 6th graders discovered...

Protectable Facts

  • Although there have been periods of drastic decline in Southern California's kelp forests, research has shown that they have a remarkable ability to recover when stressors are reduced.
  • More than 250 marine reserves have been established worldwide.
  • Marine reserves cover less than .01 percent of the ocean worldwide.
  • Scientists studied more than 120 marine reserves ranging in size and habitats. The review found that the weight of all animals and plants studied is more than 4 times larger in reserves than unprotected areas.
  • The Marine Life Protection Act, a state law introduced in 1999, requires networks of marine reserves as the backbone for California's ocean restoration and protection plan.
  • California designated thirty-four regions along the coast in the 1970s as "Area of Special Biological Significance (ASBS)" and requires 100% runoff pollution prevention in them.
  • Video
  • Facebook Fans
Join Our Newsletter
  • EarthShare_Californiaweb

SAN DIEGO COASTKEEPER
2825 Dewey Rd., Ste. 200 • San Diego CA 92106 • TEL. 619.758.7743